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zirconium

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sccmpe2.t55090303
EISBN: 978-1-62708-266-2
... Abstract Although zirconium resists stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) where many alloys fail, it is susceptible in Fe3+- and Cu2+-containing solutions, concentrated HNO3, halogen vapors, mercury, cesium, and CH3OH + halides. This chapter explains how composition, texture, stress levels...
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 3.4 Effect of zirconium additions to sand-cast binary magnesium-zirconium alloys on mechanical properties and grain size. Source: Ref 3.2 More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 27.4 Grain refinement with zirconium. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 11.3 Effect of HCl concentration in methanol on time to failure of zirconium. A, U-bend specimens, 66 °C (150 °F); B, split-ring specimens, 25 °C (77 °F); C, U-bend specimens, 25 °C (77 °F). Source: Ref 11.4 , 11.11 , 11.15 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 11.4 Effect of applied potential on the time to failure of zirconium in methanol + 0.4% HCl. U-bend specimens, 66 °C (150 °F). Source: Ref 11.15 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 11.7 Effect of stress on time to failure of zirconium in 25% FeCl 3 solution at ambient temperature. Source: Ref 11.2 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 11.9 Effect of strain rate on the mechanical properties of zirconium in CH 3 OH + 0.4% HCl at room temperature. (a) Ductility. (b) Tensile strength. Source: Ref 11.15 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 11.10 Stress-strain curves of longitudinally cut specimens of zirconium in 90% HNO 3 at room temperature. Source: Ref 11.33 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 11.12 Rest potential vs. time for zirconium with different surface conditions in 10% HCl + 500 ppm Fe 3+ at 30 °C (86 °F). Source: Ref 11.61 More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 22 Ductile-to-brittle transitions in hydrided zirconium. Source: Ref 35 More
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Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. 5.28 Discontinuous precipitation of β phase (Mg17Al12) in cast AZ80 zirconium-free magnesium casting alloy. Source: Ref 5.14 as published in Ref 5.11 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 3.16 The titanium-zirconium phase diagram. This system is typical of neutral addition elements such as zirconium, tin, and hafnium. More
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Published: 01 December 2016
Fig. 2.26 (a) Al-Zr equilibrium phase diagram. (b) Zirconium concentration in both liquid and solid solutions at peritectic reaction point (LT). Source: Ref 4 , 50 More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 15.26 Binary phase diagram of beryllium-zirconium. Phase boundaries are based on a thermodynamic model. Source: Okamoto, et al. 1987 More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 1.24 Structural ceramic parts. (a) Zirconium oxide. (b) Silicon carbide. (c) Alumina. (d) Magnesia partially stabilized zirconia More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 3.3 Grain refinement with zirconium. (a) Pure magnesium. (b) Pure magnesium plus zirconium. Source: Ref 3.1 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cw.t51820143
EISBN: 978-1-62708-339-3
... Abstract The nonferrous alloys described in this chapter include aluminum and aluminum alloys, copper and copper alloys, titanium and titanium alloys, zirconium and zirconium alloys, and tantalum and tantalum alloys. Some of the factors that affect the corrosion performance of welded nonferrous...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.emea.t52240597
EISBN: 978-1-62708-251-8
... Abstract This chapter discusses the compositions, properties, and applications of nonferrous metals, including zirconium, hafnium, beryllium, lead, tin, gold, silver, and platinum group metals. It also addresses fusible alloys and provides melting temperatures for several compositions...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cub.t66910237
EISBN: 978-1-62708-250-1
... selection, and discuss, where appropriate, the characteristic forms of corrosion that attack specific materials. The materials addressed in this chapter include carbon steels, weathering steels, and alloy steels; nickel, copper, aluminum, titanium, lead, magnesium, tin, zirconium, tantalum, niobium...
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 2.17 The titanium-molybdenum system. Molybdenum, niobium, tantalum, vanadium, hafnium, and zirconium form a complete series of beta solid solutions with titanium; hafnium and zirconium also form a complete series of alpha solid solutions. More