1-20 of 347 Search Results for

weld joint design

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.jub.t53290001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-306-5
... commonly used with fusion welding processes are shown in Fig. 1.4 . Joint designs and clearances that overwhelmingly trap the beam energy within the joint cavity are preferred for increased process efficiency. When joining thick sections, the preferred joint designs allow the weld metal to freely shrink...
Image
Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 9.14 Joint designs and dimensions for arc welding of nickel-base and iron-nickel-base superalloys Base-metal thickness ( t ), in. (mm) Width of groove or bead ( w ), in. (mm) Maximum root opening ( s ), in. (mm) Approximate amount of metal deposited, lb/ft (kg/m) Approximate More
Image
Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 23.8 Schematic sketch of joint design. (a) Before welding. (b) Enlargement of fusion zone (FZ) following welding. Source: Banaim et al. 1998 More
Image
Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 23.13 Butt-joint designs for sheet metal brazements. Source: American Welding Society 1991 More
Image
Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 23.14 Tee-joint designs for sheet metal brazements. Source: American Welding Society 1991 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ffub.t53610263
EISBN: 978-1-62708-303-4
... Abstract This chapter discusses the fatigue behavior of bolted, riveted, and welded joints. It describes the relative strength of machined and rolled threads and the effect of thread design, preload, and clamping force on the fatigue strength of bolts made from different steels. It explains...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.tpmpa.t54480265
EISBN: 978-1-62708-318-8
... sometimes are used without a gas shield. These bars must have metal-to-metal contact. Figure 12.8 shows backing fixtures used in butt welding. Similar fixtures are used for other joint designs. For fillet welds on T-joints, shielding should be supplied for two sides of the weld in addition...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930071
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
... quantitative understanding of strain development in a solidifying weld, the practical approach taken to minimize the mechanical factor is to reduce the overall weld restraint through judicious joint design and appropriate choice of welding parameters. A simple way to minimize the restraint on a solidifying...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930113
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
... include: (1) avoid fatigue crack initiation, (2) avoid fatigue crack growth, and (3) assume that fatigue crack growth will occur and design to prevent unstable fracture. In welded joints, initiating a fatigue crack is rare. Most of the time is spent in propagating preexisting features in the weld area...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.bcp.t52230401
EISBN: 978-1-62708-298-3
... Abstract Beryllium has been successfully joined by fusion welding, brazing, solid-state bonding, and soldering. This chapter describes these processes in detail along with their advantages and disadvantages. It also addresses application considerations such as surface preparation, joint design...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ahsssta.t53700215
EISBN: 978-1-62708-279-2
... be ≥13 mm (0.5 in.). Excessively large weld size is not recommended. For a lap joint, it is recommended that the thinner steel be on the top. Three-thickness joint design is not recommended. Recommended minimum steel thickness is 2 mm (0.08 in.), maximum is 9 mm (0.04 in.), and the maximum...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.jub.t53290165
EISBN: 978-1-62708-306-5
..., the processes involved in precleaning and surface preparation, types of fluxes used, solder joint design, and solder heating methods. alloying elements brazing filler metals brazing solder joints soldering fluxes soldering surface preparation BRAZING AND SOLDERING processes use a molten filler...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.jub.t53290279
EISBN: 978-1-62708-306-5
... properties must be considered when designing a dissimilar-metal joint. For a fusion welding processes it is important to investigate the phase diagram of the two metals involved. If there is mutual solubility of the two metals, the joint can usually be made successfully. If there is little or no solubility...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 April 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.imub.t53720411
EISBN: 978-1-62708-305-8
... of steel plate The observed occurrence of discontinuities and their relative amounts depend largely on the welding process used, the inspection method applied, the type of weld made, the joint design and fit-up obtained, the material utilized, and the working and environmental conditions. The most...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.stg2.t61280149
EISBN: 978-1-62708-267-9
... decisions. It discusses the basic concepts of fusion welding and the differences between solid-solution-hardened and precipitation-hardened wrought superalloys. It addresses joint integrity, design, weld-related cracking, and the effect of grain size, precipitates, and contaminants. It covers common fusion...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cw.t51820169
EISBN: 978-1-62708-339-3
... dissimilar metals joint integrity soldering weld corrosion welding weldments VARIOUS PORTIONS of a process system operate at different service conditions, therefore, different structural alloys are used in the design, and hence, dissimilar-metal welded joints may be required. Many factors must...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sfa.t52780131
EISBN: 978-1-62708-268-6
... Abstract Leaks can occur as the result of several failure causes. This chapter reviews the causes, features, and impact of various types of leaks, namely gasket leaks, O-ring leaks, bond-joint leaks, weld leaks, polyvinyl chloride leaks, valve leaks, and structural leaks. bond-joint leaks...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930163
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
... be performed on material/welded joints in the same condition. Finally, to ensure conservative assessments, the fracture-toughness tests should be performed at the minimum operating temperature of the structure. Application of Fracture-Assessment Procedures Fitness-for-service design philosophies can...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930141
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
... joint geometries. However, collecting weldment fatigue data into a limited number of broad weld “categories” (which may be an appealingly simple concept for designers) increases the apparent scatter in weldment fatigue data and reduces the allowable design stresses for a required level of safety...
Image
Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 8 Stainless steel piping such as small-bore piping is designed to leak before break. A fatigue crack either initiates at the toe or the root of the weld. (a) Typical socket fitting with a fillet weld. (b) Micrograph of a cross section through a socket-welded joint showing fatigue crack More