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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870119
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0
... Three-dimensional weaving equipment Fig. 5.28 Three-dimensional weave architectures. Source: Ref 9 Fig. 5.29 Three-dimensional (3D) woven preforms Fig. 5.31 Libra™ warp knitting machine and typical product form produced. Source: Ref 11 Fig. 5.32 Libra™ warp...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870031
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0
... 200–450 25–35 0.9 1.9 … 11 High modulus 275–400 55–90 0.5 2.0 –0.9 11 Ultra-high modulus 350 100–140 0.3 2.2 –1.6 10 Note: Representative only. For specific properties, contact the fiber manufactures. PAN, polyacrylonitrile Common weave styles used in high-performance...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.faesmch.t51270126
EISBN: 978-1-62708-301-0
... of the nozzle material in SEM indicated that it was made of chromium steel. The other atomizing parts found inside the nozzle had not suffered any damage due to heat. The Widmanstätten/basket weave microstructure seen near the flange and the stem is indicative of overheating above the transformation temperature...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870255
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0
...    flex-core 2–8 3003 Al commercial grade hexagonal core High/high 350 Hexagonal 1.8–7           Glass fabric reinforced phenolic High/high 350 Hexagonal 2–12    flex-core 2.5–5.5    OX 3–7 Bias weave glass fabric reinforced phenolic High/very high 350 Hexagonal 2–8...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870489
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0
..., continuous, oriented fiber form; however, using preforms can reduce fabrication labor. A preform can be made using rovings, chopped, woven, stitched, or unidirectional material forms. These reinforcements are formed and held in place by stitching, braiding, or three-dimensional weaving, or with organic...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.lmub.t53550385
EISBN: 978-1-62708-307-2
... fibers have greater flexibility and are more amenable to fabrication processes such as weaving or forming over radii. Typical fibers include glass, aramid, and carbon, which may be continuous or discontinuous. Fig. 8.2 Typical reinforcement options. Source: Ref 8.1 The continuous phase...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870573
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0
.... Either unidirectional or woven cloth can be prepregged, or textile techniques such as weaving or braiding can be used to form a near-net preform. To form unidirectional prepreg, tows are precoated with the interfacial protection system and filament wound on a drum, which can be prepregged...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.lmub.t53550569
EISBN: 978-1-62708-307-2
..., the fibers must have the following characteristics: high strength, environmental stability (particularly in oxygen-containing environments), creep resistance, and a coefficient of thermal expansion that is close to that of the matrix. In addition, the fibers must have a small-enough diameter to allow weaving...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mfadr7.t91110391
EISBN: 978-1-62708-247-1
.../pastes or slurries such as alumina or colloidal silica (co-silica). Cloths are either woven or non-woven, napped or without a nap. Woven cloths have a weave, like a bed sheet. Usually, this weave is apparent. Non-woven cloths have no weave, as they are manufactured by a different method. Nap refers...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.emea.t52240607
EISBN: 978-1-62708-251-8
... carbide monofilaments are straight and parallel and held together by a cross weave, usually molybdenum, titanium, or titanium-niobium wire or ribbon. The cross weave of metallic ribbon is visible in the Fig. 33.14 mat. Since thin titanium foil is required for this method, beta titanium alloys...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cfw.t52860001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-338-6
... at Brigham Young University, is a three-dimensional configuration that can be filament wound but, in the more complicated designs, is more aptly fabricated with a technology that looks more like weaving. One of the initial Isotruss applications was a composite bicycle frame weighing less than 3 lb (1.36...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ttg2.t61120033
EISBN: 978-1-62708-269-3
... Annealed 92% alpha basket-weave structure (a) STOA, solution treated, overaged Relative advantages of equiaxed and acicular titanium alloy microstructures Table 5.3 Relative advantages of equiaxed and acicular titanium alloy microstructures Equiaxed Higher ductility...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.stg2.t61280149
EISBN: 978-1-62708-267-9
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870235
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0
... for the bonding process. The surface roughness attained can, to some extent, be determined by the weave characteristics of the peel ply. Some manufacturers state that this is sufficient, while others maintain that an additional hand sanding or light grit blasting is required to adequately prepare the surface...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ffub.t53610377
EISBN: 978-1-62708-303-4
..., but often the cost increases as the diameter becomes smaller. In addition, smaller-diameter high-strength fibers have greater flexibility and are more amenable to fabrication processes such as weaving or forming over radii. Typical fibers include glass, aramid, and carbon, which may be continuous...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870373
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0
... yarns and rovings are relatively flexible and nonbrittle, they can be processed in most conventional textile operations, such as twisting, weaving, knitting, carding, and felting. Yarns and rovings are used in filament-winding, prepreg tape, and pultrusion processes. Applications include missile cases...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cw.t51820125
EISBN: 978-1-62708-339-3
... alloys and manufacturers, but maximum temperatures are usually between 90 and 200 °C (195 and 390 °F). The low fluidity of nickel-base filler metals may require manipulation or slight weaving to avoid steep toe angles that can lead to lack of fusion defects. Excessive weaving with a low travel speed...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cfap.t69780276
EISBN: 978-1-62708-281-5
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.lmub.t53550457
EISBN: 978-1-62708-307-2
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0
... processes such as weaving or forming over radii. Typical fibers include glass, aramid, and carbon, which may be continuous or discontinuous. Both the reinforcement type and the matrix affect processing. The major processing routes for polymer matrix composites are shown in Fig. 1.3 . Two types...