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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.phtpclas.t64560433
EISBN: 978-1-62708-353-9
... Abstract This appendix lists approximate equivalent hardness numbers and tensile strengths for Vickers hardness numbers for steel. This appendix is a reprint of a table giving approximate equivalent Brinell, Rockwell, Knoop, and Shore scleroscope hardness numbers and tensile strengths...
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Published: 01 December 1984
Figure 5-6 ( a ) Vickers diamond pyramid hardness tester. (Courtesy of Vickers Limited.) ( b ) Vickers, Brinell, and Rockwell tests can be performed on the Dia-Testor 2Rc hardness tester. ( Courtesy of Otto Wolpert-Werke GmbH .) ( c ) Vickers, Brinell, and Rockwell tests can be performed More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.22 Plot of carbide grain size and cobalt content, showing traces of Vickers hardness and nominal application areas More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 7 Diamond pyramid indenter used for the Vickers test and resulting indentation in the workpiece. d , mean diagonal of the indentation in millimeters. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 9 Comparison of indentations made by Knoop and Vickers indenters in the same work metal and at the same loads. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 11 Diamond pyramid indenter used for the Vickers test and resulting indentation in the workpiece. d , mean diagonal of the indentation in millimeters. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 12 Vickers hardness testers. (a) Principal components of a mechanical type. (b) Modern Vickers tester with digital readout of diagonal measurements and hardness values. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 14 Vickers hardness test. (a) Schematic of the square based diamond pyramidal indenter used for the Vickers test and an example of the indentation it produces. (b) Vickers indents made in ferrite in a ferritic martensitic high carbon version of 430 stainless steel using (left to right More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 16 Comparison of indentations made by Knoop and Vickers indenters in the same work metal and at the same loads. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 16.4 Conversion of Rockwell and Vickers hardness values, based on curve fitting. Source: Ref 16.29 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 10.49 Microhardness profile measured using Vickers hardness tester with a 500 g load as a function of the distance from the overlay surface for alloy 625 weld overlay on the waterwall of a supercritical boiler after 1 year of operation when circumferential grooves, as shown in Fig. 10.36 More
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Published: 01 December 1984
Figure 5-5 Schematic illustrating the Vickers diamond pyramid indenter and the indentation produced. (From Lysaght and DeBellis, Ref. 8, courtesy of Page-Wilson Corp., Measurement Systems Div.) More
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Published: 01 December 1984
Figure 5-7 Percentage decrease in Vickers hardness due to specimen tilting for 1, 3, or 5 or a large number (M) of indentations. (From Mulhearn and Samuels, Ref. 18, courtesy of the Metals Society.) More
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Published: 01 December 1984
Figure 5-8 Vickers hardness as a function of applied load (1 to 50 kgf) for five steel test blocks. More
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Published: 01 December 1984
Figure 5-16 Vickers microhardness as a function of test load for five hardened steel test blocks. More
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Published: 01 December 1984
Figure 5-17 Correlation of Vickers hardness with a 10-kgf load with Knoop hardness for Knoop test loads of 10 to 500 gf. (From Emond, Ref. 62, courtesy of the American Society for Metals.) More
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Published: 01 December 1984
Figure 5-22 Akashi Model AVK-HF Vickers hot-hardness tester. More
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Published: 01 December 1984
Figure 5-23 Vickers hardness and tensile strength of AISI 304 stainless steel as a function of test temperature. (From Moteff et al., Ref. 100, courtesy of the American Society for Metals.) More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 7.9 Vickers indents (50 gf) in the matrix (dark) and in the intergranular beta (white) phase in as-cast beryllium-copper (C 82500) that was burnt during solution annealing. Original magnification: 500×. Source: Ref 7.3 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 14.14 Correlation of yield and ultimate tensile strengths with Vickers hardness for steels with ferrite/pearlite microstructures, with and without microalloying. Source: Ref 14.20 More