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turning

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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 13.23: Turning: (a) terminology adopted for describing the geometries of turning tools [ 13 ]; and (b) chip equivalent. Reprinted by permission of Pearson Education, Inc. More
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Published: 30 June 2023
Fig. 7.13 Free-machining alloys and products. (a) Stringy machining chips in turning of aluminum. (b) Aluminum screws, nuts, and bolts produced from free-machining alloys such as 6262 or 2011-T6 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 2.14 Water is turning to ice during the horizontal hold More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 25 Micrograph of the blade fracture surface showing several turning gear imprints and the oxidized area (dotted line) More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 6 Elastic stress distribution: convex surfaces in contact. (a) Rolls turning at same speed. (b) Rolls turning at different speeds More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 21.7 Some basic operations performed on turning equipment. (a) Facing. (b) Straight turning. (c) Taper turning. (d) Grooving and cutoff. (e) Threading. (f) Tracer turning. (g) Drilling. (h) Reaming. (i) Boring. Cutting tool in black. Source: ASM 1989 More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 21.8 Terms applied to single-point turning tools. The side rake angle shown is positive. More
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Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 20 A dual-turret numerically controlled turning center with 16 tool stations. Courtesy of Cincinnati Milacron. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 22 Basic operations performed on turning equipment. (a) Facing. (b) Straight turning. (c) Taper turning. (d) Grooving and cutoff. (e) Threading. (f) Tracer turning. (g) Drilling. (h) Reaming. (i) Boring. Source: Ref 11 More
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Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 33 Tool forces in turning. Source: Ref 14 More
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Published: 01 January 2022
Fig. 7.32 Bed of vertical turning and boring mill More
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Published: 01 January 2022
Fig. 7.33 Vertical turning and boring machine column More
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Published: 01 December 2000
Fig. 10.2 Effect of cutting speed and feed on tool life during the turning of Ti-6Al-4V alpha-beta alloy More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 10.1 Water enters the waterwall tubes at the furnace bottom and turns into a mixture of water and steam that leaves the waterwall tubes at the top (C) and enters the steam drum where steam and water is separated. Water mixed with the replacement water (A) is returned to the waterwall More
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Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 8.12 Selection of single-turn vs. multiturn coils depending on the length-to-diameter ratio of the workpiece. From F. W. Curtis, High Frequency Induction Heating , McGraw-Hill, New York, 1950 ( Ref 1 ) More
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Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 8.13 Typical proportions of various single turn coils. From F. W. Curtis, High Frequency Induction Heating , McGraw-Hill, New York, 1950 ( Ref 1 ) More
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Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 8.22 Graphitizing of carbon using an induction coil with shorted end turns at top and bottom to restrict stray fields Source: Sohio Carborundum, Structural Ceramics Div. More
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Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 8.25 Design of a single-turn, multiplace inductor for simultaneous brazing of different-size couplings in a single operation. From F. W. Curtis, High Frequency Induction Heating , McGraw-Hill, New York, 1950 ( Ref 1 ) More
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Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 8.26 Single-turn, multiplace inductor with individual coils of copper tubing. From F. W. Curtis, High Frequency Induction Heating , McGraw-Hill, New York, 1950 ( Ref 1 ) More
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Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 8.47 Use of a liner on a single-turn channel coil to provide a wider heating pattern on the workpiece. From F. W. Curtis, High Frequency Induction Heating , McGraw-Hill, New York, 1950 ( Ref 1 ) More