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tool steel

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ts5.t65900045
EISBN: 978-1-62708-358-4
... Abstract This chapter describes the various phases that form in tool steels, starting from the base of the Fe-C system to the effects of the major alloying elements. The emphasis is on the phases themselves: their chemical compositions, crystal structures, and properties. The chapter also...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ts5.t65900067
EISBN: 978-1-62708-358-4
... Abstract This chapter describes how the phases are arranged into desired microstructures during the heat treatment of tool steels. It describes the microstructural changes that are the objectives of the austenitizing, quenching, and tempering steps of tool steel hardening. The chapter covers...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ts5.t65900109
EISBN: 978-1-62708-358-4
... Abstract Furnaces for heat treatment of tool steels include ceramic-lined salt bath furnaces, vacuum furnaces, controlled-atmosphere furnaces, and fluidized-bed furnaces. This chapter describes the classification, operating principles, application, advantages, and disadvantages of each type...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ts5.t65900305
EISBN: 978-1-62708-358-4
... Abstract Surface modification technologies improve the performance of tool steels. This chapter discusses the processes involved in oxide coatings, nitriding, ion implantation, chemical and physical vapor deposition processing, salt bath coating, laser and electron beam surface modification...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.spsp2.t54410621
EISBN: 978-1-62708-265-5
... Tools steels are defined by their wear resistance, hardness, and durability which, in large part, is achieve by the presence of carbide-forming alloys such as chromium, molybdenum, tungsten, and vanadium. This chapter describes the alloying principles employed in various tool steels, including...
Image
Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 3-17 Large broaching tool made from P/M high-speed tool steel. Source: Ref 21 More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.smnm.t52140157
EISBN: 978-1-62708-264-8
... Abstract Tool steels are specialty steels, produced in relatively low volumes, optimized for applications requiring precise combinations of wear resistance, toughness, and hot hardness. This chapter describes the AISI classification system by which tool steels are defined. It discusses primary...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170210
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... Abstract This article provides an overview of tool steels, discussing their composition, properties, and behaviors. It covers all types and classes of wrought and powder metal tool steels, including high-speed steels, hot and cold-work steels, shock-resisting steels, and mold steels...
Image
Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 22.14 M7 high-speed tool steel. (a) Decarburized steel with white layer toward top that is ferrite at surface containing carbide spheroids and black oxide. (b) Carburized with white layer consistency predominantly of martensite and retained austenite. Original magnification: 750 ×. Source More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ts5.9781627083584
EISBN: 978-1-62708-358-4
Image
Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 8.6 Microstructure of TiC in a tool steel matrix. The composite is formed by liquid-phase sintering mixed powders. The liquid phase is light, the dark phase is a carbide precipitate, and the connected structure is titanium carbide. More
Image
Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 8.7 Sintered density for a 40 μm prealloyed tool steel powder versus sintering temperature, showing how supersolidus liquid-phase sintering acts over a narrow temperature range. Source: German et al. ( Ref 2 ) More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 8.8 Microstructure after supersolidus liquid-phase sintering an M2 tool steel containing 0.8% C. The powder densifies in 10 min at 1280 °C (2335 °F) using a nitrogen-hydrogen atmosphere. More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 1 Cross section of three sizes of water-hardening tool steel (W1) after heating to 800 °C (1475 °F) and quenching in brine. Black rings indicate hardened zones (cases) (65 HRC). Cores range from 38 to 43 HRC. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 1 Microstructure of W1 tool steel after brine quenching from 790 °C (1450 °F) and tempering at 175 °C (350 °F). Dark matrix is tempered martensite. A few undissolved particles of carbide are visible (white constituent). Hardness is 64 HRC. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 2 Microstructure of D2 tool steel after air cooling from 980 °C (1800 °F) and tempering at 540 °C (1000 °F). Hardness is approximately 62 HRC. Dark matrix is tempered martensite with a dispersion of very hard carbide particles (white). See text for discussion. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 3 Hardness vs. tempering temperature for W1 tool steel after brine quenching from 790 °C (1450 °F). Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 4 Hardness vs. tempering temperature for A2 tool steel, austenitized as shown and air cooled. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 5 Hardness vs. tempering temperature for M2 high speed tool steel after austenitizing at 1220 °C (2225 °F) and tempering for time periods and temperatures as shown. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.78 Schematic cross section of two bimetallic saw blades. (a) The tool steel (high-speed steel) is fusion welded to a cheaper, higher toughness steel that will make up the body of the saw band. (b) The high-speed steel is forge welded (using pressure and temperature) to the tough steel More