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thermal expansion

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Book Chapter

By A. F. Clark
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 1983
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mlt.t62860075
EISBN: 978-1-62708-348-5
...Methods of measurement of thermal expansion at low temperatures. Table 3.1 Methods of measurement of thermal expansion at low temperatures. Method Sensitivity (m) Accuracy (%) Temperature Range (K) Major Advantages Major Disadvantages Mechanical 10 –6 10 –3 4–3000...
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 3.4 Typical curves of thermal expansion, L ( T ), and thermal expansion coefficient, α , as a function of temperature. More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 3.24 Ratio of the thermal expansion to the thermal expansion coefficient as a function of temperature for copper and aluminum. More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 3.25 Deviation of the ratio of thermal expansion to thermal expansion coefficient for various metals and alloys from that of copper as a function of temperature. More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 3.20 Thermal expansion coefficient vs. temperature for several low-expansion materials. More
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Published: 01 April 2004
Fig. 4.13 Coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of Osprey controlled-expansion alloys (based on aluminum-silicon) as a function of the proportion of silicon, in weight percent More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 2.18 The thermal analysis curve (a) and the thermal expansion curve (b) for pure iron A 3 transformation (circled) is an abnormal one progressing in the opposite direction (from “coarse” to “dense”). More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 22 Thermal analysis of oriented plastic. CTE, coefficient of thermal expansion More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 4.4 Thermal expansion correction for tooling More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 1 Coefficient of thermal expansion mismatches in plastic IC packages. More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 2 Effect of coefficient of thermal expansion in heat treating a shaft. Source: Ref 6 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 3 Two gear designs showing the effect of coefficient of thermal expansion. At left is a widely used design, which is very troublesome to heat-treat. A preferred design is shown at right. Source: Ref 11 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 2.1 Mean coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) between 25 °C (77 °F) and the temperature shown for a conventional nickel-base superalloy (Inconel 718), a conventional low-CTE superalloy (Incoloy 909), and a three-phase-strengthened low-CTE superalloy (Inconel 783). Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 8.6 The relation between thermal expansion coefficient and the temperature at which the viscosity is 10 7 Pa·s (10 8 poise). Compositions that promote lower working temperatures have higher coefficients of thermal expansion. More
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Published: 01 December 1989
Fig. 8.13. Thermal-expansion data for various chromium steels ( Ref 51 ). More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 4.6 General relationship between coefficient of thermal expansion, or CTE (between 273 and 373 K), and melting point for metals, T m . Adapted from Li and Krsulich [1996] More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 4.8 Coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of low-carbon steel and iron-nickel alloys as a function of temperature. The low CTE of iron-nickel alloys exists only over a limited range of temperature. Normal expansion behavior is observed above about 400 °C (750 °F). More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 4.9 Coefficient of thermal expansion of liquid-phase sintered tungsten and molybdenum materials as a function of the content of the main braze constituents, namely copper and nickel. More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 4.10 Coefficient of thermal expansion of double-sided copper-clad molybdenum at room temperature as a function of the copper thickness More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 7.31 Effect of coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch, relative to that of the ceramic, on the shear strength of silicon nitride/metal brazed joints. Adapted from Naka, Kubo, and Okamoto [1989] More