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thermal conductivity

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 1983
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mlt.t62860133
EISBN: 978-1-62708-348-5
... Abstract This chapter presents basic principles and the theoretical results of heat transport in solids. Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity are the principal properties discussed. Discussions are also included on the effects of temperature, magnetic field, and metallurgical variations...
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 4.18 Thermal conductivity variation in oxygen-free, high-conductivity copper that is due to RRR variation, as observed by (I) Hust and Giarratano (1974b) and (2) Powers, Schwartz, and Johnston (1950) . More
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Published: 01 December 1996
Fig. 9-2 (a) The thermal conductivity and (b) thermal diffusivity of steels as a function of temperature. (From J.B. Austin, Flow of Heat in Metals , American Society for Metals, Metals Park, Ohio (1942), Ref 1 ) More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 20 Effect of glass addition on thermal conductivity. PBT, polybutylene terephthalate; PC, polycarbonate More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 17.2 Thermal conductivity and expansion of metals in relation to polymers, ceramics, and composites. Source: Adapted from Ref 17.7 More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 4.1 Typical thermal conductivity illustration: temperature dependencies of selected technically important materials from 3 to 300 K. Only a single curve is shown for each material, as is customary, but this is misleading for pure materials. More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 4.3 Experimentally determined curves of thermal conductivity for various pure copper specimens from 4 to 300 K. Each of these specimens is reported to contain less than 0.1% impurity. 1 — White and Tainsh (1960); 2 — Powell, Roder, and Hall (1959) , 3 — White (1953) ; 4 — Berman More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 4.8 Typical electronic component of thermal conductivity for metals: temperature dependencies and imperfection (defect) densities progressing from pure, annealed metals to highly alloyed metals. More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 4.10 Two-thermometer type of axial-flow thermal conductivity apparatus used at Oak Ridge National Laboratory ( Laubitz and McElroy, 1971 ). More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 4.11 Eight-thermometer type of axial-flow thermal conductivity apparatus used at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado ( Hust and Giarratano, 1974a ). More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 4.19 Thermal conductivity changes in pure copper induced by drawing and by annealing. 1 — Powell, Roder, and Hall (1959) ; 2 — White (1953) . More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 4.20 The thermal conductivity of copper as a function of temperature at constant tensile strain ( Gladun and Holzhauser, 1964 ). More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 4.21 The thermal conductivity of copper as a function of tensile strain at constant temperature ( Gladun and Holzhauser, 1964 ). More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 4.22 Thermal conductivity of copper as a function of neutron exposure; irradiation performed at a temperature of 300 K ( Bowman et al., 1969 ). More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 4.25 Thermal conductivity of copper with residual resistivity ratios from 20 to 2000. The estimated curves are obtained by interpolating the experimental family of curves and application of the W-F-L law (see later sections). Each of the measured specimens contain less than 0.1 More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 4.27 Thermal conductivity of aluminum alloys at temperatures from 4 to 300 K. More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 4.29 The thermal conductivity of Cu–Zn alloys ( Rosenberg, 1963 ; Lomer, 1958 ). More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 4.31 Thermal conductivity of high-temperature nickel alloys. More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 4.32 The thermal conductivity of Al 2 O 3 crystals with rough and smooth surfaces. □, •, -⋄- = specimens with smooth surfaces; ○, Δ, ▿ = specimens with rough surfaces. • = batch a; ○ = batch b; □, -⋄-, Δ, ▿ = batch c ( Berman, 1976 ). More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 4.33 Thermal conductivity of several glasses from 4 to 300 K ( Childs et al., 1973 ). 1 — quartz-1; 2 — quartz-2; 3 — quartz-3; 4 — Phoenix-1; 5 — Phoenix-2; 6 — glass; 7 — Pyrex. More