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tension-overload fracture

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.faesmch.t51270078
EISBN: 978-1-62708-301-0
... Abstract This chapter explains how investigators determined that a stabilizer link rod fractured due to overload, possibly by a combination of tension and bending forces that occurred during an accident. It includes images comparing the fractured rod with its undamaged counterpart recovered...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.faesmch.t51270162
EISBN: 978-1-62708-301-0
... examination. Based on their observations and the results of SEM fractography, failure analysts concluded that the gusset plates failed due to a downward bending overload in tension and that the tail rotor control cable snapped due to tensile overload. There were no indications of delayed failure in any of the...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mmfi.t69540047
EISBN: 978-1-62708-309-6
... shaft under simple (a) tension, (b) torsion, and (c) compression loading, and the single-overload fracture behavior of ductile and brittle materials The values of σ max and τ max , and sometimes the planes on which they act, are the stress factors of greatest interest. Fracture from a...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.uhcf3.t53630071
EISBN: 978-1-62708-270-9
... shaft under pure (a) tension, (b) torsion, and (c) compression loading. Also shown is single-overload fracture behavior of ductile and brittle materials under these loading conditions (bottom diagrams). T, tension. C, compression. Adapted from Ref 1 When a shaft or similar shape is pulled by...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.uhcf3.t53630101
EISBN: 978-1-62708-270-9
... BEFORE STUDYING this chapter on single-overload ductile fracture, it is recommended that the reader review the first three paragraphs, at least, of Chapter 8, “Brittle Fracture,” in this book. This will give an overall perspective of the very different but closely related subjects of brittle and...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cfap.t69780404
EISBN: 978-1-62708-281-5
... terms of their fracture behavior, polymers are generally classified as brittle or ductile, as discussed further in the next section in this article, “ Fractography .” Brittle polymers are those that are known to fracture at relatively low elongations in tension (2 to 4%). These include PS, PMMA, and...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.uhcf3.t53630117
EISBN: 978-1-62708-270-9
... Abstract Fatigue fractures are generally considered the most serious type of fracture in machinery parts simply because fatigue fractures can and do occur in normal service, without excessive overloads, and under normal operating conditions. This chapter first discusses the three stages...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ffub.t53610055
EISBN: 978-1-62708-303-4
... marks on the fracture surface ( Fig. 39 ). Fig. 39 Crack arrest lines on edge-notched tension specimens. Material thickness: 13 mm (½ in.), 10 mm (⅜ in.), and 6 mm (¼ in.). Note the distance for first arrest, which increases with section thickness, and note that the arrest lines are not closed...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ffub.t53610209
EISBN: 978-1-62708-303-4
... Tension K 1 1.0 0.58 0.9 (a) K d     where d ≤ 10 mm (0.4 in.) 1.0 1.0 1.0     where 10 mm (0.4 in.) < d ≤ 50 mm (2 in.) 0.9 0.9 1.0 K s See Fig. 16 (a) A lower value (0.06 to 0.85) may be used to take into account known or suspected undetermined...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ffub.t53610001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-303-4
... geometries. These curves are useful when investigating a design and doing a life assessment. Stress intensity is the controlling factor in subcritical crack growth propagation rates and the identification of the critical crack size for the onset of rapid overload (critical fracture). Stress and crack...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fahtsc.t51130043
EISBN: 978-1-62708-284-6
... case, an ISO 12.9 low-alloy bolt failed by ductile torsional overload. The fracture was smooth, with fracture initiating from the threads. The fracture mode was microvoid coalescence (Ref 9) , which occurs by the following process: A free surface is created from a small particle. This particle...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.faesmch.t51270031
EISBN: 978-1-62708-301-0
.... With the additional visual observation that the fracture was at the center of a necked down region, all modes other than tension overload were eliminated. That reduced the choice of failure mode-attribute combination to four: tension-overload—high-temperature, tension-overload—corrosion, tension...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mmfi.t69540215
EISBN: 978-1-62708-309-6
... θ = 0: (Eq 5.1) σ y ∝ a / 2 π r Fig. 5.3 Stress-intensity factors for a through-thickness crack subjected to uniform far-field tension. Source: Ref 5.8 This proportional relation can be used to define an explicit relation between the applied stress σ and...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mmfi.t69540121
EISBN: 978-1-62708-309-6
... General features of fatigue fractures Final fracture occurs during the last stress cycle when the cross section cannot sustain the applied load. The final fracture—which is the result of a single overload—can be brittle, ductile, or a combination of the two. For some materials, such as relatively...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.faesmch.t51270025
EISBN: 978-1-62708-301-0
... examined in the TEM, the features observed on a fluorescent screen and recorded in a photographic film. The image is then interpreted to throw light on the mechanism of fracture. Figure 4.7 is a typical TEM fractograph of a ductile material failed by overload in tension. Tensile overload fracture is...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ffub.t53610147
EISBN: 978-1-62708-303-4
... then propagates slowly through the material in a direction roughly perpendicular to the main tensile axis, as illustrated in Fig. 9 . Ultimately, the cross-sectional area of the member is reduced to the point that it can no longer carry the load, and the member fails in tension. The fracture surface...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.faesmch.t51270185
EISBN: 978-1-62708-301-0
... Abstract A pair of bolts on a connecting rod failed during a test run for a prototype engine. They were replaced by bolts made from a stronger material that also failed, one due to fatigue, the other by tensile overload. The fracture surfaces on all four bolts were examined using optical and...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cfap.t69780417
EISBN: 978-1-62708-281-5
... generally result in fracture surfaces that contain fatigue striations. Fatigue striations, however, are not easily found in composite materials. This is partly because there may be little difference macroscopically between specimens that failed in fatigue and those that failed in overload by tension or...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cfap.t69780238
EISBN: 978-1-62708-281-5
... increases as the fatigue crack, a , advances in length. Fig. 6 Coordinate system for crack-tip stresses in model I loading (see Eq 5 ) Fig. 7 Specimens employed in fatigue crack propagation studies. (a) Single-edge-notch specimen. (b) Compact-tension specimen Fracture mechanics...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ffub.t53610549
EISBN: 978-1-62708-303-4
... tension produces a flat (square) fracture normal (perpendicular) to the maximum tensile stress and frequently a slant (shear) fracture at approximately 45°. This 45° slant fracture is often called a shear lip. Many fractures are flat at the center but surrounded by a “picture frame” of slant fracture. An...