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tensile yield strength

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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 8.11 Notch-yield ratio versus tensile yield strength for selected aluminum alloy castings More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 8.13 Notch-yield ratio versus tensile yield strength for welds in aluminum alloy castings for combinations of casting alloys and filler alloys (middle number) More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 8.15 Notch-yield ratio versus tensile yield strength for aluminum casting alloys at –320 °F (–196 °C) and –423 °F (–253 °C) More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 8.17 Notch-yield ratio versus tensile yield strength for welded aluminum alloy castings at –320 °F (–196 °C) for combinations of casting alloys and filler alloys (middle number) More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 11.37 Notch-yield ratio vs. tensile yield strength for aluminum alloys at 4 K ( Kaufman and Wanderer, 1971 ). ○ — 2xxx alloys; ● — 3xxx alloys; □ — 5xxx alloys; ◊ — 6xxx alloys; △ — 7xxx alloys; ▽ — casting alloys. More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 17.3 Elastic modulus vs. tensile yield strength of metals and polymers. The plot of ceramic strength is their compressive yield strength, because brittle ceramics are not suitable in applications with tensile stress. Elastomer strength is tear strength. The symbol σ f is used More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 8 Correlation between tensile yield, strength elongation, and magnesium content for some commercial aluminum alloys More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 12.76 Comparison of tensile yield strength (0.2% proof stress) for PC cast and longitudinal SCDS and CGDS cast alloys vs. temperature More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 17.9 Tensile yield strength of hot-pressed blocks as a function of temperature, comparing grade S-200F with grade S-200E beryllium in transverse and longitudinal directions. Source: Haws 1985 More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 17.66 Tensile yield strength of hot-pressed beryllium as a function of matrix iron tested at several temperatures following heating at 732 °C (1350 °F) until equilibrium is reached. Dashed lines indicate pinning by matrix precipitate, FeB 11 . Source: Stonehouse 1979 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 6.9 Effective tensile yield strength variations as a function of temperature and hold time represented by the Larson-Miller parameter More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 7.10 Effect of tempering temperature on the tensile yield strength of two steels. (a) Composite stress-strain curve for a Ni-Cr steel (0.57% C, 3.07% Ni, 0.9% Cr) where arrows denote limit of proportionality. Source: Ref 19 . (b) Stress for 0.001 plastic deformation (σ 0.001 ) for a high More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 8.20 Unit propagation energy versus tensile yield strength for aluminum alloy castings More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 8.23 Plane-strain fracture toughness, K Ic , versus tensile yield strength for selected aluminum alloy castings. SC, sand cast alloy; PE, premium engineered alloy More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 9.34 The room-temperature tensile-yield strength (0.2% offset) of a series of Fe–Ni alloys containing a martensitic or ferritic structure ( Speich and Swann, 1965 ; Roberts and Owen, 1967 ). More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 11.18 Tensile yield strength and elongation of AISI type 310 austenitic stainless steel at room temperature and 20 K as a function of percent cold work ( Christian, Gruner, and Girton, 1964 ). More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 15.18 Changes in yield strength (a) and tensile strength (b) as a function of time at temperatures of 350 to 500 °C (660 to 930 °F). The as drawn strengths correspond to the 0 heating time, and the galvanized strengths are given by the horizontal dashed line. Source: Ref 15.50 More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 14.3 Tensile strength (UTS), yield strength, and elongation as a function of temperature for extruded Lockalloy LX62. Source: London 1979 More
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Published: 01 December 1996
Fig. 8-47 (Part 1) Factors affecting (a) the tensile strength and (b) the yield strength of structural steels with a primary ferrite-pearlite microstructure. (From T. Gladman, D. Dulieu, and I.D. Mclvor, in MicroAlloying 75 , p 32, Union Carbide Corporation, New York (1977), Ref 24 ) More
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Published: 01 December 1996
Fig. 8-47 (Part 2) Factors affecting (a) the tensile strength and (b) the yield strength of structural steels with a primary ferrite-pearlite microstructure. (From T. Gladman, D. Dulieu, and I.D. Mclvor, in MicroAlloying 75 , p 32, Union Carbide Corporation, New York (1977), Ref 24 ) More