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tensile fracture

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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 12.1 Example of tensile fracture with stretching in fracture region in a bolt with cracks that opened up during bolt tensioning. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 October 2005
Fig. CH37.2 SEM photograph of broken end of a wire showing tensile fracture preceded by necking (typical cup and cone fracture) More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 2 Appearance of (a) ductile and (b) brittle tensile fractures in unnotched cylindrical specimens. Courtesy of G. Vander Voort. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 19 Appearance of ductile (a) and brittle (b) tensile fractures. Source: Ref 28 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 41 As-received notched tensile specimen showing location of fracture. Tensile specimen was fabricated from 4340 steel, heat treated to 1515 MPa (220 ksi), and chromium plated. More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 5.36 Scatterbands for the tensile true fracture strain of a 0.4% C steel at three strength levels as a function of the total inclusion projected length in the fracture plane. Inclusions, total projected length. Source: Ref 58 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 16.17 Brittle fracture surface of a smooth (unnotched) tensile test specimen More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.19 Brittle fracture of a smooth (unnotched) tensile test specimen. Source: Ref 2.10 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.39 SEM fractographs of the tensile test fracture surface of a high-purity, coarse-grained Al-4.2Cu alloy with (a) intergranular facets at low magnification (10×) and (b) uniform dimples on one facet at higher magnification (67×). The microstructure indicated alloy depletion at the grain More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.85 Fracture surface of a tensile bar showing linking up of cavities on grain boundaries perpendicular to the maximum principal stress axis. Source: Ref 2.51 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. A7.2 Plane-strain fracture toughness as a function of material tensile yield strength. Comparison of several 2000 and 7000 series aluminum alloys. Source: Ref A7.1 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. A8.1 Plane-strain fracture toughness as a function of material tensile yield strength for four-point notch-bend specimens of mill-annealed Ti-6Al-4V. Source: Ref A8.2 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. A10.3 Plane-strain fracture toughness of 4345 steel as function of tensile yield strength and sulfide content. Source: Ref A10.2 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 2 Example of a macroscale ductile fracture in tensile loading More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 3 Example of a macroscale brittle fracture in tensile loading More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 4 Example of a macroscale brittle fracture in tensile loading More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 4 Microvoids on the fracture surface of AA6061-T1 tensile testpiece More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 5 Tensile testpiece of gray cast iron presenting brittle fracture More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 2 A fractured tensile specimen with the typical cup-and-cone fracture characteristic of ductile metals fractured in tension. More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 33 Tensile fatigue fracture starting near the center of an 8-in.-diam piston rod of a forging hammer, made of low-carbon alloy steel hardened to 24 HRC at the surface and 17 HRC at the center. In an axially loaded part such as this, fatigue fracture can start anywhere in the cross section More