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tantalum alloys

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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 14.14 Effect of tantalum on the corrosion resistance of titanium-tantalum alloys in boiling acid solutions More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 3.10 Grain-boundary migration for tantalum alloy T-111 in ultrahigh vacuum in CC-type loading cycle. Source: Ref 3.6 More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 3.17 Typical example of CP cracking in tantalum alloy T-111 in ultrahigh vacuum. (a) Micrograph. Source: Ref 3.6 . (b) CP, CC, PC, and PP life relationships at 1150 °C (2100 °F). Source: Ref 3.3 More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 11 Corrosion rate versus tungsten content for tantalum-tungsten alloys exposed to concentrated H 2 SO 4 at 180 °C (360 °F) and 210 °C (405 °F) More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cw.t51820143
EISBN: 978-1-62708-339-3
... Abstract The nonferrous alloys described in this chapter include aluminum and aluminum alloys, copper and copper alloys, titanium and titanium alloys, zirconium and zirconium alloys, and tantalum and tantalum alloys. Some of the factors that affect the corrosion performance of welded nonferrous...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cpi2.t55030148
EISBN: 978-1-62708-282-2
..., copper, titanium, zirconium, vanadium, niobium, and tantalum alloys. hydrogen damage iron-base alloys nickel alloys aluminum alloys copper alloys titanium alloys zirconium alloys vanadium alloys niobium alloys tantalum alloys HYDROGEN DAMAGE is a form of environmentally assisted...
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 12 Influence of alloying elements on the corrosion rate of binary tantalum alloys exposed 3 days to 95% H 2 SO 4 at 250 °C (480 °F). Source: Ref 9 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170308
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... Abstract This article discusses the role of alloying in the production and use of common refractory metals, including molybdenum, tungsten, niobium, tantalum, and rhenium. It provides an overview of each metal and its alloys, describing the compositions, properties, and processing...
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Published: 01 November 2013
, copper alloys, magnesium alloys, beryllium, stainless steels, nickel alloys, titanium and titanium alloys, iron and nickel and cobalt superalloys, niobium and niobium alloys, tantalum and tantalum alloys, molybdenum and molybdenum alloys, tungsten alloys Process variations Closed-die forging More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930353
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
... Abstract This article discusses the weldability and fusion weld properties of refractory metal alloys. The alloys discussed include tantalum, niobium, rhenium, molybdenum, and tungsten. molybdenum niobium rhenium tantalum tungsten weldability THE REFRACTORY METALS, which include...
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Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 1 Elevated-temperature tensile strength of annealed base metal and tantalum alloy arc welds. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 6.39 Comparison of isothermal 1150 °C (2100 °F) and bithermal 1150 ⇔ 205 °C (2100 ⇔ 400 °F) fatigue behavior of the tantalum alloy ASTAR 811C in ultrahigh vacuum. Source: Ref 6.25 More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.emea.t52240583
EISBN: 978-1-62708-251-8
... metals except for tantalum. Since the DBTT rises with impurity content, strict control of impurities is necessary during alloy processing. Niobium is used as an alloying element in steels, superalloys, and nonferrous alloys, accounting for approximately 95% of its production. Since niobium has...
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 13 Corrosion rate versus concentration for tantalum and Ta-10W alloy exposed to H 2 SO 4 at various temperatures. Source: Ref 10 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cpi2.t55030112
EISBN: 978-1-62708-282-2
... Abstract This chapter discusses some of the metallurgical factors that affect corrosion of weldments and describes a few considerations for selected nonferrous alloy systems: aluminum, titanium, tantalum, and nickel. weld corrosion weldments aluminum titanium tantalum nickel...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930039
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
... and a macroscopically homogeneous and defect-free weld pool. Fig. 16 Elemental line scans of titanium, aluminum, vanadium, and tantalum spanning the HAZ and fusion zone of the 2.5 mm (0.100 in.) thick Ti-6Al-4V sheet welded using a 0.127 mm (0.005 in.) thick tantalum shim The properties of titanium alloys...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sap.t53000059
EISBN: 978-1-62708-313-3
... is an essential alloying addition in cobalt- and nickel-iron-base superalloys and is used to stabilize the face-centered cubic (fcc) matrix within the service temperature range. Niobium is added for γ″ precipitate formation and also for solid-solution hardening. Tantalum is added for carbide formation and solid...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ex2.t69980567
EISBN: 978-1-62708-342-3
... alloys, molybdenum, niobium, tantalum, zirconium alloys, titanium, and titanium alloys. chemical composition extrusion ferrous alloys nonferrous alloys This appendix provides approximate compositions for metals and alloys in commonly extruded alloy families: Table 1 , aluminum alloys...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cub.t66910237
EISBN: 978-1-62708-250-1
... selection, and discuss, where appropriate, the characteristic forms of corrosion that attack specific materials. The materials addressed in this chapter include carbon steels, weathering steels, and alloy steels; nickel, copper, aluminum, titanium, lead, magnesium, tin, zirconium, tantalum, niobium...
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 4.6 Effect of alloy content on martensite-start (M s ) temperature of binary alloys. Tantalum has the least effect, while iron depresses the M s at the greatest rate. These rates correlate with strengthening in beta-stabilized systems. More