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surface morphology

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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.2 Light scattering at an etched pearlite surface showing surface morphology of the ferrite (α) and cementite (Cm) phases More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 9.12 Surface morphology of phosphoric acid anodizing. Source: Ref 9.2 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 8.5 Surface morphology of chromic/sulfuric acid etch (FPL). Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 8.6 Surface morphology of phosphoric acid anodize (PAA). Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 8.7 Surface morphology of chromic acid anodize (CAA). Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.29 Optical micrographs showing typical nitride morphology of a surface nitride layer that formed on the alloy surface when exposed to NH 3 (100% NH 3 in the inlet gas and 30% NH 3 in the exhaust) for 168 h at 650 °C (1200 °F) for (a) Type 446, (b) Type 304, (c) alloy 600, (d) alloy More
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Published: 01 December 2016
Fig. 1.28 Morphology of the surface of the primary silicon precipitates. (a) Steps at growth front. (b) Concentric growth steps. (c) Spiral growth steps. (d) Concave edge grooves, TPRE mechanism. Aluminum-silicon hypereutectic alloy. SEM, deep etched More
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Published: 01 March 2000
Fig. 15 Schematic of the morphology of the die bearing surface More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 6.15 Fracture morphologies of fracture surfaces of 4340 steel CVN specimens heat treated as: (a) oil quenched and tempered at 200 °C (390 °F) and (b) isothermally transformed at 430 °C (810 °F). Source: Ref 6.16 More
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Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. 15.39 Fracture morphologies of fracture surfaces of 4340 steel Charpy V-notch specimens heat treated as: (a) oil quenched and tempered at 200 °C (390 °F), and (b) isothermally transformed at 430 °C (810 °F). Source: Ref 15.24 as published in Ref 15.19 More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 7.11 Tin whisker morphologies: (a) a fluted whisker on Sn-Cu finish surface, and (b) many other whiskers bent at a sharp angle. Source: Ref 7.11 , p 148 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.omfrc.t53030147
EISBN: 978-1-62708-349-2
... may be entrapped between the adjacent plies, resulting in voids in the cured structure ( Ref 11 , 12 ). The quantity and location of the voids depends on many factors, including the tack, prepreg impregnation, surface morphology, lay-up and nesting, thickness of lay-up, debulking stage, and cure...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870235
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0
.../sulfuric acid etch (Forest Products Laboratory, FPL), phosphoric acid anodize (PAA), and chromic acid anodize (CAA). Forest Products Laboratory etching is a chromic/sulfuric acid etch and is one of the earliest of the modern methods developed for aluminum surface preparation. The FPL oxide morphology...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ascaam.t59190001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-296-9
... parts. It also describes the mechanism behind dendritic grain crystallization and how factors such as surface tension, capillary length, and lattice symmetry affect dendritic arm size and spacing. The section that follows examines the morphology of the silicon crystals that form in aluminum-silicon...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cpi2.t55030082
EISBN: 978-1-62708-282-2
.... The surface morphology evolves through the coalescence and diffusion of surface vacancies and vacancy clusters. Dissolution is supported when vacancy clusters contact “A” atoms in the surface layer or expose large clusters of “A” atoms in the second-layer terrace. The vacancy clusters grow with continued...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.omfrc.t53030115
EISBN: 978-1-62708-349-2
... Abstract Transmitted-light methods reveal more details of the morphology of fiber-reinforced polymeric composites than are observable using any other available microscopy techniques. This chapter describes the various aspects relating to the selection and preparation of ultrathin-section...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.omfrc.t53030211
EISBN: 978-1-62708-349-2
... complicated by the addition of a reinforcing phase ( Ref 2 ). The addition of discontinuous or continuous fibers and the volume fraction of the fibers affect the crystallinity in the matrix. In addition, differences in fiber surface roughness, size, surface activation, and sizing affect the nucleation...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.omfrc.t53030177
EISBN: 978-1-62708-349-2
... cross sections of different multiphase-matrix composites that were sectioned, ground, and polished at between 10 and 20 degrees off parallel to the surface in order to view a larger area of the interlayer region. The multiphase morphology of these two systems is very complex. The dispersed phase...
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 9.4 Microcracked carbon fiber composite material illustrating the crack morphology in a fiber tow that is in the same plane as the polished surface. Bright-field illumination, 10× objective More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 5 (a) Inner surface of a 12-in.-diameter crude oil pipeline that experienced an in-service leak. (b) Metallographic cross section of the leak location showing undercutting within the pit, a pitting morphology that is typically associated with MIC. More