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surface hardening

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 April 2024
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.phtpp.t59380085
EISBN: 978-1-62708-456-7
... treatment steel SURFACE HARDENING differs from through hardening and involves special heat treating requirements and important process control variables for specific treatment categories. The major advantages of surface hardening steels over conventional hardening are: Surface hardening produces...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.spsp2.t54410499
EISBN: 978-1-62708-265-5
... Mechanical components often require surface treatments to meet application demands. This chapter describes several surface hardening treatments for steel and their effect on microstructure, composition, and properties. It discusses flame hardening, induction heating, carburizing, nitriding...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.emea.t52240395
EISBN: 978-1-62708-251-8
... Abstract This chapter discusses the process characteristics, advantages, disadvantages, and applications of various processes involved in surface hardening of steel. These include pack carburizing, liquid carburizing, gas carburizing, vacuum carburizing, plasma carburizing, gas nitriding...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.smnm.t52140189
EISBN: 978-1-62708-264-8
... Abstract The design requirements for mechanical shafts, pinions, and gears often call for features with very hard surfaces (to resist wear) based on a softer core (to avoid brittle fracture). This chapter explains how to selectively harden steel by diffusing carbon and nitrogen atoms...
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 46 Residual stress profile below the surface after induction surface hardening. Source: Ref 15 More
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Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 10.14 Examples of surface-hardened gears using through surface hardening definition. (a) Transmission gear pinion. (b) Shaft/helical gear. (c) Pump gear. Courtesy of ERS Engineering, Inc. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 9.31 Surface hardening of steel by induction. (a) Tooth-by-tooth induction hardening of a gear. (b) Hardening of hammerheads. Courtesy of Ajax Tocco Magnethermic More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 7 Single-shot induction surface hardening of a cylindrical workpiece. Source: Ref 15 , 16 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 9 Different methods of induction surface hardening of gear wheels. Source: Ref 15 , 16 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 19 Typical examples of induction surface hardening of (a) carbon steel and (b) alloyed steel gears produced from carbon steel (a) and alloyed steel (b) More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 31 Hardness reached after induction surface hardening at various heating rates in steel with 0.45% C. Source: Ref 15 , 27 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 48 Residual-stress profiles after induction surface hardening at various input energies. Source: Ref 15 , 54 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 49 Temperature cycles during single-shot induction surface hardening, at various depths. Source: Ref 15 , 54 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 55 Residual-stress profile after induction surface hardening on sample A of the mean bearing location in the middle of the crankshaft and on sample C on the extreme left side. Source: Ref 15 , 20 , 44 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 60 Residual-stress profiles after induction surface hardening for heterogeneous and homogeneous austenite at austenitizing temperature. Source: Ref 20 , 47 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 74 Distortion after induction surface hardening with (a) dual frequency and (b) single frequency. Source: Ref 20 , 57 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 79 Subsurface residual-stress profile after induction surface hardening and grinding (absolute stress) on bearing location “A”. Source: Ref 15 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 102 Worm characteristics after induction surface hardening. Source: Ref 83 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.90 Ductile cast iron subjected to surface hardening. Graphite, martensite, and retained austenite. Camshaft. HRC 56. Etchant: nital. Courtesy of W. Guesser, Tupy Fundições, Joinville, SC, Brazil. More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 4 Comparison of various diffusion surface hardening techniques. Source: Ref 1 More