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structural steel

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Image
Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 1.5 Micrograph of ASTM A 36 structural steel showing a microstructure consisting of ferrite (light etching constituent) and pearlite (dark etching constituent). Etched in 4% picral followed by 2% nital. 200× More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.81 Structural steel containing C = 0.08%, Si = 0.19%, Mn = 1.47%, S = 0.004%, Ti = 0.012%. Determining the nucleation conditions for intragranular ferrite (acicular) in a complex nonmetallic inclusion. Simulated welding thermal cycle: heating to 1440 °C (2625 °F) for 4 s followed More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.2 (Part 1) Structural steel subjected to heat treatment at 625 °C (1155 °F) for different times. The spheroidization of the carbides with increasing holding times is evident. (a) Specified strength of 413 MPa (60 ksi), with a starting microstructure of ferrite and fine pearlite. (b More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.2 (Part 2) Structural steel subjected to heat treatment at 625 °C (1155 °F) for different times. (c) Specified strength of 690 MPa (100 ksi), produced using quenching and tempering heat treatment (see the sections “ Quenching and Tempering ” and “ Tempering ” in this chapter More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.19 Longitudinal cross section of a thick plate of structural steel WStE355 (C = 0.19%, Mn = 1.2%) 38 mm (1.5 in.) thick, normalized. In this figure, the longitudinal direction of the plate is along the vertical direction. (a) Surface region of the plate (on the left side, slight More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.16 Sulfur print of a thick rolled plate of structural steel WStE355. Section transverse to the main rolling direction, region corresponding to the top of the conventional ingot used to roll the plate, in mid-width. Some concentration of sulfides can be seen, elongated in the transverse More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.67 Cross section of a structural steel plate (ferrite and pearlite) that was exposed to a building fire. Oxidation with the formation of a thick layer of oxides in the plate surface, and a region that suffered partial decarburization. The kinetics of the oxidation and the decarburization More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 14.29 Transverse cross section to a weld in structural steel with yield strength of 379 MPa (55 ksi) (see Fig. 14.1 ). At the top of the image is the weld-deposited metal. The base of the image shows the region of grain refinement. Compare to Fig. 14.28 . Etchant: nital 2% and picral 4 More
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Published: 01 December 1996
Fig. 8-34 Diagram showing for a structural steel the recrystallization process as a function of the reduction in thickness by rolling and the rolling temperature. The numbers in the circles are ASTM grain size values. (From same source as Fig. 8-27 ) More
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Published: 01 December 1996
Fig. 8-43 Schematic illustration of the hot rolling process used for structural steels. The width of the cross-hatched area is an indication of the plate thickness. (Adapted from J.K. Baird and R.R. Preston, in Processing and Properties of Low Carbon Steel , The Metallurgical Society, Warrendale More
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Published: 01 December 1996
Fig. 8-44 A continuous cooling TTT diagram for a structural steel, showing a cooling curve typically used in making sheet material. (From J.D. Grozier, in MicroAlloying 75 , p 241, Union Carbide Corp., New York (1977), Ref 21 ) More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.phtpclas.t64560263
EISBN: 978-1-62708-353-9
...Abstract Abstract Structural steels are used for components such as I-beams and automobile frames. This chapter focuses on processing these steels to attain a fine primary ferrite grain size to develop high strength. It first reviews the concepts and principles of recrystallization...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.lmcs.t66560081
EISBN: 978-1-62708-291-4
...Abstract Abstract This chapter covers a broad range of low-carbon steels optimized for structural applications. Low-carbon structural steels are generally considered the highest-strength steels that can be welded without undue difficulty, even in the field. They include mild steels, carbon...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.msisep.t59220475
EISBN: 978-1-62708-259-4
...Abstract Abstract This chapter discusses the properties and compositions of steels used in pressure vessels, piping, boilers, rebar, and other structural applications. It covers fine-grained steels, quenched and tempered steels, and controlled rolled (thermomechanical treatment) steels. It also...
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 22 Heavy buildup of corrosion scale on weathering steel structural members in conditions of poor air circulation, high humidity, and no wetting/drying More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 23 Heavy corrosion scale buildup on structural members of weathering steel at a packet where water could collect and stand More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 8.55 Main structural features of a killed steel conventional ingot. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 1 Fatigue strength of carbon steel structural joints. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 30 April 2021
Fig. 8.1 Steel shapes available from suppliers: (a) structural shapes, (b) coiled strip and sheet, (c) plate, (d) coiled wire, (e) rod, (f) rounds, (g) pipe, (h) tubing, (i) pigs, (j) ingots, (k) rail, (l) rebar, (m) forgings More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 7.2 Structural changes in martensitic steel resulting from tempering. Source: Ref 4 More