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stress-strain curve

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Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aacppa.t51140193
EISBN: 978-1-62708-335-5
... Abstract The stress-strain curves in this data set are representative examples of the behavior of several cast alloys under tensile or compressive loads. The curves are arranged by alloy designation. Each figure cites the original source of the curve and provides pertinent background...
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 3.8 True stress-strain curve versus engineering stress-strain curve More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 3.15 Stress-strain curve for dynamic strain aging More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 2.18 Cyclic stress-strain curve and strain history for a straining block. (a) Cyclic stress-strain amplitude curve. (b) Strain history More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 3.25 Use of the cyclic stress-strain curve to obtain the strain-hardening exponent and transition strain range. Source: Ref 3.26 More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 6 The low-strain region of the stress-strain curve for a ductile material More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 8.12 Nominal stress cycle and corresponding local stress-strain curve by Neuber procedure. (a) Nominal stress cycle. (b) Simulated local stress-strain curve. Source: Ref 8.15 More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 7.14 Yield points in stressstrain curve: (a) upper yield stress; (b) lower yield stress. More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 3.3 Typical engineering stress-strain curve for a ductile material. Source: Ref 3.1 . More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 3.4 The first portion of a stress-strain curve illustrating how the 0.2% offset yield strength is determined. Source: Ref 3.1 . More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 25 Tensile stress-strain curve for several types of polymeric materials. Source: Ref 26 More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 1 General stress-strain curve showing elastic and plastic portions of a typical curve. Area marked “Yield” is the area of transition from elastic to plastic deformation. Yield strength, yield point, elastic limit, and proportional limit are all in this area. See Glossary for specific More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 3 Typical stress-strain curve for a low-strength, easily deformable metal, such as aluminum foil used for household wrapping More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 6 Complete engineering stress-strain curve showing the normally considered tensile region (upper right) and the often neglected compression region (lower left) More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 1 The area under a stress-strain curve taken to specimen fracture gives a rough estimate of the toughness of steels. In general, toughness varies inversely with strength. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.42 Schematic presentation of the stress-strain curve of a material when dynamic recrystallization happens. Recrystallization eliminates work hardening and keeps the load needed to cause plastic deformation at reasonable levels during the stages of the hot working process. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 12.1 Engineering stress-strain curve for a steel that does not show discontinuous yield. After plastic deformation starts, the force required to continue deformation increases (and thus so does the engineering stress) up to the start of the specimen “necking.” After this point, work More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 12.2 Engineering stress-strain curve for a steel that shows discontinuous yielding. The region of discontinuous yielding is shown. During the heterogeneous deformation that occurs with discontinuous yielding, Lüders bands are formed ( Fig. 12.3 and 12.4 ). If at point a the load More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 3.2 Engineering stress-strain curve. The intersection of the dashed line with the stress-strain curve determines the offset yield strength. More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 3.4 Typical tension stress-strain curve for a ductile metal indicating yielding criteria. Point A is the elastic limit; point A′ is the proportional limit; point B is yield strength or offset (0 to C) yield strength; 0 is the intersection of the stress-strain curve with the strain axis. More