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stress-intensity factor

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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 4.20 Stress corrosion cracking velocity versus stress intensity factor. (a) Type A, dotted line; type B, solid line. (b) Type C behavior More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 2.5 Schematic of stress intensity factor vs. crack velocity obtained using fracture mechanics methods. Stage II (plateau) velocity and K ISCC are identified. Source: Ref 2.30 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 5.24 Stress-intensity factor for a pin-loaded hole obtained by superposition More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 8.26 Fatigue crack growth rate ( R = 0.1) versus stress-intensity factor at room temperature for A356.0-T6 aluminum alloy castings produced by various processes More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 8.27 Fatigue crack growth rate ( R = 0.5) versus stress-intensity factor at room temperature for A356.0-T6 aluminum alloy castings produced by various processes More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 8.29 Creep crack growth as a function of applied stress-intensity factor for selected wrought aluminum alloys More
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Published: 01 December 1989
Fig. 2.4. Stress-intensity-factor solution for semi-infinite plate with center crack. More
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Published: 01 December 1989
Fig. 3.30. Crack-growth rate vs stress-intensity factor for (a) Inconel 738 and (b) Inconel 939 ( Ref 158 ). More
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Published: 01 December 1989
Fig. 9.54. Creep-crack-growth rates as a function of stress-intensity factor for IN 738 LC and IN 939 at 850 °C (1560 °F) in air ( Ref 9 and 84 ). More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 8 An S-shaped fatigue crack propagation. K , stress-intensity factor; K c , fracture toughness curve indicating its three characteristic regions. More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 6-25 General form of the stress intensity factor—K Ic —and material thickness, B More
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Published: 01 February 2022
Fig. 3 The fatigue-crack growth rate vs. stress intensity factor range for HEAs and other conventional alloys. Source: Ref 60 – 73 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 5.3 Stress-intensity factors for a through-thickness crack subjected to uniform far-field tension. Source: Ref 5.8 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 5.4 Stress-intensity factors for cracks emanating from a circular hole. Data points: Paris and Sih. Solid lines: uniaxial tension (Newman’s fit). Dotted lines:equi-biaxial tension (Liu’s fit). Source: Ref 5.6 , 5.7 , 5.11 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 5.5 Stress-intensity factors for central crack loaded in a retangular plate with opposite forces at the center of the crack, where P is the force (load) per unit thickness. Source: Ref 5.12 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 5.11 Normalized stress-intensity factors for single through-thickness cracks emanating from a straight lug subjected to a pin loading applied in the 0° loading direction. Source: Ref 5.15 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 5.12 Normalized stress-intensity factors for single through-thickness cracks emanating from a tapered lug subjected to a pin loading applied in the 0° loading direction. Source: Ref 5.15 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 5.13 Normalized stress-intensity factors for single through-thickness cracks emanating from a tapered lug subjected to a pin loading applied in the 180° loading direction. Source: Ref 5.15 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 5.14 Normalized stress-intensity factors for single through-thickness cracks emanating from a tapered lug subjected to a pin loading applied in the −45° loading direction and its reversed direction, R o / R i = 2.25. Source: Ref 5.15 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 5.15 Normalized stress-intensity factors for single through-thickness cracks emanating from a tapered lug subjected to a pin loading applied in the −90° loading direction and its reversed direction, R o / R i = 2.25. Source: Ref 5.15 More