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strain hardening

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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 18.10 The effect of strain rate on ductility (top), strain hardening (middle), and tensile and yield strengths (bottom) of an 0.14% C steel with martensitic microstructure tested at 150 °C (300 °F). Source: Ref 18.10 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 18.28 Strain hardening as a function of true strain for quenched 4330 specimens tensile tested after tempering at various temperatures for 1 h. Courtesy of Young-Kook Lee. Source: Ref 18.31 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 18.29 Strain hardening as a function of true strain in quenched 4340 specimens tensile tested after tempering at various temperatures for 1 h. Courtesy of Young-Kook Lee. Source: Ref 18.31 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 18.30 Strain hardening as a function of true strain for quenched 4350 specimens tensile tested after tempering at various temperatures for 1 h. Courtesy of Young-Kook Lee. Source: Ref 18.31 More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 5.10 Variation of strain-hardening rate with temperature at various strain rates for various alloys. Source: Ref 5.4 More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 3.25 Use of the cyclic stress-strain curve to obtain the strain-hardening exponent and transition strain range. Source: Ref 3.26 More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 8 Log-log plot of true stress-true strain curve n is the strain-hardening exponent; K is the strength coefficient. More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 25 Comparison of the engineering stress-strain curves for non-strain-hardening samples without or with a 1 or 2% taper predicted using the direct-equilibrium approach. Source: Ref 29 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 3.5 Schematic comparison of strain hardening (a) and strain softening (b) phenomena More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 12.2 Schematic diagrams of strain-hardening and flow stress curves that show the effect of (a) carbon content and (b) grain size on the uniform elongation ε* of low-carbon steels. Source: Ref 12. 7 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 4.2 Variation of strain-hardening exponent with yield stress for conventional steels. Source: Ref 4.1 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 3.24 Relationship between yield strength and the strain-hardening exponent, n , for a variety of steel microstructures. Source: Ref 3.9 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 12 Plot to determine strain-hardening exponent ( n ) and strength coefficient ( K ). Source: Ref 6 More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 6.30 Relationship between strain-hardening coefficient K ij and hold-time for thermomechanical fatigue cycles for 2¼Cr-1Mo steel in postweld, heat treated condition. (a) PC, out-of-phase, 250 ⇔ 600 °C (480 ⇔ 1110 °F). (b) CP, in-phase, 600 ⇔ 250 °C (1110 ⇔ 480 °F), 0.004 ≤ Δε T More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 2A1.1 Derived relation between strain-hardening exponent n and ratio of ultimate tensile strength to offset yield strength, S u /σ y , Eq 2A1.8 More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 2A2.1 Cyclic strain hardening/softening behavior of two steels. (a) AM 350 alloy. (b) 52100 bearing steel ( Ref 2.4 ) More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 12.15 Determination of cyclic strain-hardening exponents for three test materials for which the slope of the elastic line is calculated. (a) Polypropylene data ( Ref 12.4 ). (b) Nylon 6/6 ( Ref 12.3 ). (c) Polycarbonate ( Ref 12.3 ) More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 7.6 Strain-hardening behavior of copper: yield and ultimate strengths and elongation vs. temperature ( Carreker and Hibbard, 1953 ). More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. A.42 Graphical solution for the strain-hardening exponent ( n = U c / U p ) from the conventional stress-strain curve. Source: Ref A.48 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 4.6 Effect of strain-hardening exponent on crack-tip plastic zone shape. Source: Ref 4.15 , 4.16 More