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steel tubes

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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 14.19 Preferential sulfidation penetration formed in waterwall steel tubes More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 2.89 Extruded stainless steel tubes. The thin wall sections that can be seen under the extruded sections are produced by roll forming. Source: Krupp-Hoesch More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 5.61 Extrusion of alloy steel tubes on a horizontal press [ Sar 75 ] More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.20 Lugless joints made between mild steel tubes using (a) the 54Cu-35Zn-6Ni-4Mn-1Si brazing alloy and (b) the reference 44Ag-30Cu-26Zn brazing alloy More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 12.4 Carbon steel waterwall suffering blown tubes due to high wastage rates resulting in significant tube-wall thinning after 8 months of service in a WTE boiler. Courtesy of Welding Services Inc. More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 12.5 Alloy 625 overlay superheater tubes (on 15Mo3 steel substrate) after 4.5 years of service in a superheater producing 405 °C (760 °F)/42 bar (609 psi) superheated steam, showing no evidence of corrosion or erosion/corrosion. Source: Ref 24 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 12.30 Carbon steel superheater tubes protected by metallic tube shields awaiting installation at one WTE plant. More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 15.9 Austenitic stainless steel tube that was corroded where a fabric bag was taped to it. Source: Ref 15.4 , courtesy of M.D. Chaudhari More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 3.62 Microstructure of an ASME SA 210 steel tube consisting of (a) ferrite (light etching constituent) and pearlite (dark etching constituent) and (b) a hydrogen-damaged region showing cracks (arrows) at the pearlite/ferrite interfaces. 4% picral etch. 1000× More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 1 Typical flaws in resistance welded steel tubing, (a) contact marks (electrode burns), (b) hook cracks (upturned fiber flaws), (c) weld area crack, (d) pinhole, (e) stitching. Views (c), (d), and (e) are mating fracture surfaces of welds. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 3 Setup for the flux leakage inspection of welded steel tubing. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 10.8 Close-up view of a waterwall carbon steel tube showing pitting attack after 1 year of service in a subcritical unit in the United States, burning coal containing about 3.0 to 3.5% S and about 300 to 400 ppm chlorine. Source: Ref 14 . Courtesy of Welding Services Inc. More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 10.19 A corroded carbon steel tube sample from the waterwall of a boiler (subcritical unit) retrofitted with a low NO x burner system with overfire air ports. The waterwall tube suffered accelerated wastage after the furnace was retrofitted with NO x burner system. Courtesy of Welding More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.110 Oil-ash corrosion in low-alloy steel tube: (a) scale formation, (b) wall thinning More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 4 (a) Fracture surface of a steel tube, at approximately actual size, showing point of crack initiation (at arrow), chevron and fanlike marks, and development of shear lips. (b) Fracture-origin area. Original magnification 5×; note that fracture nuclei differ in texture from the main More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 5 Intergranular corrosion of a type 304L stainless steel tube in a shuttle orbiter ammonia boiler. (a) Test performed to show tube ductility. 1×. (b) Cross section through the thin-wall (0.2 mm, or 8 mils) tube revealing sensitization on outside diameter due to carbonaceous deposit formed More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 4 Fracture of a steel tube. (a) Fracture surface at approximately actual size, showing point of crack initiation (at arrow), chevron and fanlike marks, and development of shear lips. (b) Fracture-origin area at 5×; note that fracture nuclei differ in texture from the main fracture surface More
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Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 20 Effect of normalizing on resistance welded 1015 steel tube. (a) Transverse section with vertical band of the fusion zone and heat affected zone on each side. (b) Normalized tube wit weld zone at center. Light areas are ferrite, dark pearlite. More
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Published: 01 January 2022
Fig. 13.20 Upper and lower control arms fabricated from steel tubing More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fibtca.t52430149
EISBN: 978-1-62708-253-2
... rupture, including overheating, high-temperature creep, graphitization, and dissimilar metal welds. It explains how to determine which mechanisms are in play by interpreting fracture patterns and microstructural details. It also describes the investigation of several carbon and low-alloy steel tubes...