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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ahsssta.t53700263
EISBN: 978-1-62708-279-2
...), transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP), and martensitic (MS) grades of steel. They were developed to extend the strength range of traditional HSS beyond the 800 MPa (115 ksi) limit. However, the increase in strength came at the expense of ductility, especially in MS steels, where the percent elongation drops...
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 2.23 Elongation-strength-hardness chart for currently used steel grades. Source: Adapted from Ref 2.8 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 3.12 Comparison of forming limit diagrams for various steel grades. Source: Ref 3.6 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 4.3 Instantaneous n -values for different steel grades. Source: Ref 4.1 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 5.13 Forming limit diagrams for various cold rolled DP steel grades. Source: Ref 5.1 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 7.7 Engineering stress-strain curves for a series of TRIP steel grades. Source: Ref 7.2 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 7.8 True stress-strain curves for a series of TRIP steel grades. Source: Ref 7.2 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 11.2 Mapping vehicle applications to steel grades. Source: Ref 11.2 More
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Published: 01 January 2022
Fig. 12.109 Carbon steel grades and applications More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 21.8 Torsional strength as a function of case depth for various grades of steel. Source: Ref 21.16 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 3.7 Comparison of engineering stress-strain curves for three grades of steel. Source: Ref 3.4 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 3.8 Stress-strain curves of various grades of high-strength steel (HSS) and SS301LN. Source: Ref 3.5 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 4.13 Stretchability of various grades of steel. Source: Ref 4.1 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 4.17 Variation of limiting draw ratio with different steel types and grades. Source: Ref 4.1 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 12.3 Energy needed to form a part from three different grades of steel. Source: Ref 12.2 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 11.1 Comparison of the red hardness of cobalt-bearing grades of high-speed steel (M33, M36, and T15) vs. that of non-cobalt-bearing grades (M1, M2, M4, M7, and T1). Source: Ref 11.8 More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 4 Deep-drawing properties of steel sheet grades More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 6.5 Hardenability ranges for two case-hardening grades of steel. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 4 End-quench hardenability limits for the hardenability grades of cast steel specified in SAE J435c. The nominal carbon content of these steels is 0.30% C. Manganese and other alloying elements are added as required to produce castings that meet these limits. More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ahsssta.t53700059
EISBN: 978-1-62708-279-2
... ultimate tensile strength. The steel grade designator uses the classification shown in Table 3.1 . High-strength steel (HSS) and advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) grade classification Table 3.1 High-strength steel (HSS) and advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) grade classification HSS grades...