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steel composition

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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 3.4 Examples of how steel composition can affect the Ac 1 , Ac 3 , and Ac cm phase boundaries. Data for 3%NiCr steel are experimental; data for 8620 steel are estimated. Source: Ref 12 , 13 More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 5.8 Hardness vs. grain size. Steel composition: 0.82C, 0.9Mn, 0.31 Si, 1.76Ni, 0.72Mo, and Cr (per table). Source: Ref 17 Retained austenite, % Cr, % Reheat and quench Direct quench ○ 0 25 23 • 0.3 25 20 Δ 0.6 35 23 ▴ 1.3 32 32 □ 0.9 39 39 More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 8.32 Final retained carbon in Fe-2Ni steel composition sintered at 1300 °C (2370 °F) for 60 min in different mixtures of hydrogen and nitrogen. Source: Miura et al. ( Ref 7 ) More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 22.3 Hardness penetration curve for W1 tool steel. Composition: 1.06 C, 0.36 Mn, 0.27 Si, 0.01 S, 0.015 P, 0.05 Cr. 19 mm(¾ in.) round bar, brine quenched from 815 °C (1500 °F). Pretreated by oil quenching after 40 min at 870 °C (1600 °F). Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 3 Type 410 stainless steel. Composition: 0.11 C, 0.44 Mn, 0.37 Si, 0.16 Ni, 12.18 Cr. Austenitized at 980 °C (1800 °F). Grain size 6 to 7. (a) Time-temperature-transformation (TTT) curve. (b) End-quench hardenability. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 3 Effect of carbon on hardenability of carburized 1018 steel. Composition of 0.17 C, 0.72 Mn, 0.01 Si, 0.01 Cr, 0.007 Mo, with McQuaid-Ehn grain size 6–8. All bars normalized 925 °C (1700 °F). Core—austenitized 20 min, 925 °C. Case—pack carburized 9 h, 925 °C, direct quenched. Source More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 4 Tempering curve for type 440C stainless steel. Composition: 1.02 C, 0.48 Mn, 0.017 P, 0.011 S, 0.18 Si, 0.54 Ni, 16.90 Cr, 0.64 Mo. Heat treated at 1040 °C (1905 °F), 2 h. Oil quenched from 66 to 94 °C (150 to 200 °F). Double stress relieved at 175 °C (345 °F), 15 min. Water quenched More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 23.14 Schaeffler constitution diagram for stainless steels. Compositions are by weight. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 5.7 M S temperatures as a function of carbon content in steels. Composition tion ranges of lath and plate martensite in Fe-C alloys are also shown. Source: Ref 5.10 ; investigations indicated are identified by their numbers in this reference More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 5.89 Process principle for the production of Al-alloy steel composite bus bar More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 14-49 Location of high-speed steel compositions on a temary plot of Fe-C-carbide-forming elements. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 June 2007
Fig. 3.10 Auger composition depth profile of a type 316L stainless steel green part. Source: Ref 21 . Reprinted with permission from MPIF, Metal Powder Industries Federation, Princeton, NJ More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 1 Composition and property linkages in the stainless steel family of alloys More
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Published: 01 December 1989
Fig. 3.26. Effects of material composition (steel A had a lower impurity content than steel D) and simulated postweld heat treatment on creep-crack-growth behavior of 1¼Cr-½Mo steels ( Ref 149 ). More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 5 Effect of gas composition and temperature on corrosion rate of steel. Source: Ref 28 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 10.10 Carbon and silicon composition ranges of common cast irons and steel. Source: Ref 10.4 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.6 Schematic TTT curve for a Fe-C steel with eutectoid composition. The overall kinetics of pearlite formation is similar to that discussed in Fig. 9.4 for single-phase ferrite. As cementite and ferrite must nucleate ( Chapter 7, “Equilibrium Phases and Constituents in the Fe-C System More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.7 (a) and (c) Steel with eutectoid composition cooled slowly from the single-phase austenitic field. Pearlite. (b) and (d) Steel with eutectoid composition air cooled from the single-phase austenitic field. The difference in lamellar spacing and colony size can be seen. Nital 2 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.56 Steel with the composition indicated in Fig. 9.55 austenitized at 900 °C (1650 °F) for 200 min (a) heterogeneous austenitic grain size revealed with etchant based on picric acid (75 ml distilled water, 55 ml teepol [industrial detergent], and 3 g picric acid). (b) After air-cooling More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 15.30 Railway wheel. Steel has a chemical composition very close to the eutectoid. Close to the tread, (a) deformed fine pearlite, (b) deformed fine pearlite and pro-eutectoid ferrite. (c) Away from the tread, still in the region subjected to accelerated cooling. Fine pearlite. Etchant More