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Book Chapter

By L. L. Sparks
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 1983
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mlt.t62860047
EISBN: 978-1-62708-348-5
... Abstract Specific heat is a fundamental property that relates the total heat per unit mass added to a system to the resultant temperature change of the system. This chapter begins with the definition and historical development of specific heat. Thermodynamic and solid state relationships...
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 2.3 Specific heat of diamond calculated using (a) Einstein’s specific heat function and θ E = 1326 K, (b) Debye’s specific heat function and θ D = 2050 K, and (c) experimental data (o— Desnoyers and Morrison, 1958 ). Dashed lines indicate a T 3 temperature dependence More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 2.1 Specific heat as a function of temperature for several types of material. Typical behaviors are illustrated for metals (aluminum, beryllium, and copper), semiconductors (carbon and silicon), an amorphous inorganic (Pyrex glass) ( Corruccini and Gniewek, 1960 ), and for an organic More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 2.7 Temperature dependence of the electronic contribution to the specific heat. More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 2.10 Specific heat of NiSO 4 ·6H 2 O (Δ— Stout and Hadley, 1964 ) and holmium (▪— Lounasmaa, 1962 and □— van Kemper, Miedema, and Huiskamp, 1964 ) as a function of temperature. The observed Schottky effect is a result of cooperative electronic spin alignment in the case of NiSO 4 ·6H 2 More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 2.12 Electronic specific heat for superconducting vanadium expressed as C ES / γT C vs. T C / T . Experimental data ( Corak, Goodman, Satterthwaite, and Wexler, 1954 ) are well represented by the energy-gap formula (---) over the entire temperature range whereas the T 3 More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 2.13 Ratio of specific heat to molar volume and temperature as a function of T 2 for a composite of niobium wires. These data include the specific heat of the addenda. The specimen was cooled prior to application of a 0.1-T field ( McConville and Serin, 1964 ). More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 2.15 Components of total specific heat in copper. The cubic lattice term is dominate except at very low temperatures. More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 2.19 Specific heat of copper calculated using θ D = 310 K and θ D = 348 K. Experimental points (□— Sandenaw, 1959 ) are included for comparison. The electronic contribution (see Fig. 2.15 ) has been removed from the 5-K experimental point. More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 2.20 Specific heat as a function of temperature for five composite materials. The true shapes of the fiber-reinforced composite curves are somewhat uncertain because of the widely spaced data points. The calculated values for the polystyrene foam are based on 98 wt.% polystyrene and 2 More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 3.26 Temperature dependence of the constant, Q 0 , relating specific heat to volume expansivity for the Cu-Ni system. More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 3.27 Dependence on composition of the constant Qo relating specific heat to volume expansivity for the Cu-Ni system. More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 9.16 Specific heat, C p , variations when cooling to 20 K and subsequently warming to higher temperatures. Total heat content of anomalous Δ C p ( C p dT ) is 39.3 kJ/kg for lithium and 38.9 kJ/kg for Li–0.95 at.% Mg. ( Martin 1960a , 1960b .) More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 13.4 Discontinuity in the specific heat, C, of a superconductor at T c ( Powell and Clark, 1977 ). More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 27-14 The influence of temperature on the specific heat of an AISI 1010 carbon steel ( 4 ) More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 27-16 Variation of specific heat with temperature for several wrought stainless steels (10). The nearest cast equivalent grades are: 304 ~ CF-8; 310 ~ CK-20, HK-40; 316 - CF-8M; 410 - CA-15. More
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Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 6 Specific heat of iron from 0 to 3200 K. T C is the Curie temperature. Source: Ref 3 More
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