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Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 4.6 Solution potentials at the solution/metal interface for environments of indicated specific resistivities. Refer to Fig. 4.3(a) and (b) . More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 2.1 A substitutional solid solution (a) and an interstitial solid solution (b) More
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Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 19 Effect of solution-treating temperature on the solution-treated and aged properties of Ti-6Al-4V. Age cycle: 540 °C (1000 °F) for 8 hours More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 4.21 Effect of solution-treating temperature on the solution-treated and aged properties of Ti-6Al-4V. Age cycle: 540 °C (1000 °F) for 8 h More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 3.9 Free-energy curves for an ideal solution and a regular solution of A-B binary system. (a) Ideal solution, Ω AB = 0. (b) Solution with Ω AB < 0 (c) Solution with Ω AB > 0. A concave region appears at the temperature below T C = Ω AB /2 R (see section 4.4 ). More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.emea.t52240041
EISBN: 978-1-62708-251-8
... Abstract When a metal is alloyed with another metal, either substitutional or interstitial solid solutions are usually formed. This chapter discusses the general characteristics of these solutions and the effects of several alloying elements on the yield strength of pure metals. It presents...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.tm.t52320055
EISBN: 978-1-62708-357-7
... Abstract This chapter explains the idea of solution theory and the nature of mixed materials. The chapter considers approximation of free energy by the regular solution model and sublattice model. It discusses chemical potential and nonrandom distribution based on the interactions between...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1984
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mpp.t67850552
EISBN: 978-1-62708-260-0
... Abstract This appendix lists chemical polishing solutions and procedures used in metallographic sample preparation. chemical polishing metals Metallography Principles and Practice George F. Vander Voort, p 552-561 DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mpp.t67850552 Copyright © 1999 ASM International®...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1984
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mpp.t67850562
EISBN: 978-1-62708-260-0
... Abstract This appendix provides detailed information on the processes and procedures used in electrolytic polishing. It lists important process parameters, including time, temperature, voltage, and current density, as well as the recipes of electrolytic solutions used. The information...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.smnm.t52140005
EISBN: 978-1-62708-264-8
... Abstract In order to understand how the strength of steels is controlled, it is extremely useful to have an elementary understanding of two topics: solutions and phase diagrams. This chapter provides an introduction to these topics with suitable examples. mechanical strength phase...
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 4.12 Effect of applied stress on the time to failure of solution-annealed and electropolished type 347 tested in a magnesium chloride solution boiling at 145 °C (293 °F). After Ref 4.42 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 4.33 Time to failure (hours) of various Fe-Cr-Ni alloys in a 50% NaOH solution at 300 °C (570 °F) with 14 MPa (2 ksi) oxygen. Specimens stressed at 140 MPa (20 ksi). NF, no failure. After Ref 4.111 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 5.5 Time-temperature-transformation diagram for solution-treated alloy 625. Lower γ″ limit determined by hardness measurement. Source: Ref 5.15 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 5.25 Effect of chromium content on the time to failure of solution-annealed Ni-Cr-Fe alloys tested in H 3 BO 3 + LiOH solutions containing hydrogen at 360 °C (680 °F). Source: Ref 5.103 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 6.5 Comparison between observed and predicted crack growth rate vs. solution conductivity for (a) statically loaded type 316L and (b) sensitized type 304 stainless steels in 288 °C (550 °F) water containing 200 ppb O 2 . Source: Ref 6.32 – 6.35 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 6.18 Theoretical relationships between threshold fluence and solution conductivity for commercial-purity type 304 stainless steel. Relationships are shown for various stress levels along with observed threshold fluences for “high” and “low” stress core components in operating BWRs. Source More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 7.4 Potential pH diagram for a system of copper and a water solution with 1.0 g·mol/L of ammonia partly as ammonium sulfate and 0.05 g·atom/L of dissolved copper added as sulfate at 25 °C (77 °F). Numbers refer to equations from Ref 7.9 . The shaded zone marks solution properties More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 7.16 Effects of grain diameter and solution pH on the stress required to initiate cracking of α brass in Mattsson’s solution in slow-strain-rate tests. Source: Ref 7.49 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 7.17 Effect of percent of cold work and phase (solution and vapor) on elongation of alloy C36000 in 15 N aqueous ammonia containing 6 g/L dissolved copper in slow-strain-rate tests (1.6 × 10 −5 /s). Source: Ref 7.54 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 7.18 Effect of percent of cold work and phase (solution and vapor) on time to failure of α brass in 15 N aqueous ammonia containing 6 g/L dissolved copper in constant load tests at 50% of the yield strength. Source: Ref 7.54 More