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solubility

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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 4.11 Solubility curve in A-B system. (a) Mutual solubility curve where A and B have different crystal structures. (b) Solubility curve for a compound. The dotted lines in the phase diagrams indicate the equilibrium lines for metastable systems. More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 7 Copper-nickel phase diagram with complete solid solubility. The diagram consists of two single-phase fields separated by a two- phase field (L + α). The boundary between the liquid field (L) and the two- phase field is called the liquidus; that between the two-phase field and the solid More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 8 Copper-silver phase diagram with limited solubility More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 26.11 Solubility of hydrogen in aluminum. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 16 Influence of temperature on solubility of calcium carbonate and magnesium oxide. Source: Ref 61 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 2.31 Equilibrium binary solid solubility as a function of temperature for alloying elements most frequently added to aluminum More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 2.33 Solubility curve of carbon in the ferritic (body-centered cubic) portion of the iron-carbon phase diagram. Note that carbon alloying creates a two-phase region of ferrite (α) and austenite (γ). This is a factor in steel heat treatment (see Chapter 9, “Heat Treatment of Steel More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 2.34 Solubility curve of carbon in the austenitic (face-centered cubic) portion of the iron-carbon phase diagram. Also shown is the solubility limit of the cementite carbide (Fe 3 C) in iron. More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 2.2 Solubility limits in the lead-tin system More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 2.8 Fe-O equilibrium phase diagram. (a) Solubility of oxygen in liquid iron and the various oxides formed. (b) Magnification of the iron-rich corner, between 0 and 0.01% (100 ppm) oxygen. The very low solubility of oxygen in all solid phases of Fe is evident. Source: Ref 13 , 14 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 19.28 Hydrogen solubility in iron as a function of temperature and crystal structure at one atmosphere pressure of hydrogen. Source: Ref 19.93 More
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Published: 01 June 2007
Fig. 5.36 Solid solubility of carbon in austenitic stainless steel. Source: Ref 42 More
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Published: 01 June 2007
Fig. 5.44 Solubility of nitrogen in chromium-nickel steels in equilibrium with gaseous nitrogen or nitrides, depending on temperature and partial pressure of nitrogen. Source: Adapted from Ref 52 More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 5.1 Solubility of hydrogen in aluminum at 1 atm hydrogen pressure More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 8 Solubility parameter map of critical strain to craze in polycarbonate, taking into account molar volumes, V 0 , and polar contributions to the solubility parameter. The numbered symbols represent critical strain to craze. δ pa , solubility parameter for a polar polymer; δ 0a More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.8 Hydrogen solubility in iron at 1 atm as a function of temperature. Solubility in austenite is substantially higher than in ferrite. The maximum solubility happens in the liquid phase. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 8.21 Solubility products vs. temperature for various compounds in austenite. Source: Ref 8.36 More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 7.13 Maximum solubility of hydrogen in nickel and iron at H 2 pressure = 1 atm. Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 25 Equilibrium binary solid solubility as a function of temperature for alloying elements most frequently added to aluminum More
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Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 27 Solubility curve of carbon in the ferritic (bcc) iron and a portion of the eutectoid region in carbon steel. See also Fig. 2 and 3 in Chapter 2 . The Ae 2 line is the boundary under equilibrium conditions between the one-phase α ferrite region and the two-phase (α + γ) region More