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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 April 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ps.t62440049
EISBN: 978-1-62708-352-2
... Abstract This chapter presents an overview and survey of solder alloy systems. Extensive reference is made to phase diagrams and their interpretation. The chapter describes the effect of metallic impurities on different solders. The chapter concludes with a review of the key characteristics...
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Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. 5.9 Selection of lead-tin solders. Source: Ref 5.2 More
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Published: 01 April 2004
Fig. 3.5 (a-f) Spread tests of four common solders, melted on NiCr/Au substrates at 10 °C (18 °F) superheat, in controlled atmospheres. There is negligible benefit from a hydrogen-rich atmosphere. Although somewhat subjective, the solders melted in the 40% hydrogen atmosphere do appear More
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Published: 01 April 2004
Fig. 3.5 (g-l) Spread tests of four common solders, melted on NiCr/Au substrates at 10 °C (18 °F) superheat, in controlled atmospheres. There is negligible benefit from a hydrogen-rich atmosphere. Although somewhat subjective, the solders melted in the 40% hydrogen atmosphere do appear More
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Published: 01 April 2004
Fig. 3.14 Oxide thickness versus oxidation time for a range of solders held in air 140 °C (284 °F) above their melting point. Adapted from Dong, Schwarz, and Roth [1977 ] More
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Published: 01 April 2004
Fig. 3.15 Oxide growth on molten solders at an oxygen partial pressure of 1 Pa (1.5 × 10 –4 psi). Adapted from Kuhmann et al. [1998 ] More
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Published: 01 April 2004
Fig. 4.24 Void content versus joint length for a range of representative solders. The substrates were square coupons of polished alumina metallized with thin-film titanium/gold, applied by sputtering. The joints were made at a superheat of 25 °C, and the void level was assessed by quantitative More
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Published: 01 April 2004
Fig. 5.3 Stress-rupture life of joints made with low-melting-point solders, tested at room temperature. Silver-tin solder is more resilient than lead-tin eutectic, while indium-tin alloys are less able to resist creep. More
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Published: 01 April 2004
Fig. 5.27 Yield strength of composite solders at room temperature plotted as a function of volume fraction of the added intermetallic powder [ Yost, Hosking, and Frear 1993 ] More
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Published: 01 April 2004
Fig. 5.31 Tensile strength and elongation to failure of Ag-96.5Sn solders doped with cerium and lanthanum. The samples were chill-cast ingots of solder, 20 mm (0.8 in.) long by 10 mm (0.4 in.) in diameter, tested at room temperature and a strain rate of 4 × 10 –3 /s. RE, rare earth More
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Published: 01 April 2004
Fig. 5.32 Tensile strength and elongation to failure of Sn-9Zn solders doped with lanthanum. The samples were chill-cast ingots of solder, 25 mm (1 in.) long by 5 mm (0.2 in.) in diameter, tested at room temperature and a strain rate of 5 × 10 –3 /s. RE, rare earth More
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Published: 01 April 2004
Fig. 5.33 Stress-rupture life of Sn-3.5Ag and Sn-3.5Ag-0.25RE solders for an applied stress of 20 MPa (2900 psi) at 50° C (122 °F) More
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Published: 01 April 2004
Fig. 5.35 Contact angle and spread area of Ag-96.5Sn solders doped with cerium and lanthanum melted on copper at 300 °C (572 °F) for 30 s under cover of RMA flux. RE, rare earth More
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Published: 01 April 2004
Fig. 5.36 Wetting force of Sn-9Zn solders doped with lutetium on copper using rosin-activated flux at 245 °C (473 °F) in air. RE, rare earth More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.jub.t53290165
EISBN: 978-1-62708-306-5
... Abstract Brazing and soldering processes use a molten filler metal to wet the mating surfaces of a joint, with or without the aid of a fluxing agent, leading to the formation of a metallurgical bond between the filler and the respective components. This chapter discusses the characteristics...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 April 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ps.9781627083522
EISBN: 978-1-62708-352-2
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 April 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ps.t62440189
EISBN: 978-1-62708-352-2
... Abstract This chapter presents several materials and processes related to soldering technology. It first provides information on lead-free solders, followed by sections devoted to flip-chip processes, diffusion soldering, and modeling. Scanning acoustic microscopy and fine-focus x-ray...
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 4 3D X-Ray tomography of the failing solder bump interface. Missing solder observed between the interposer and the laminate at the fail location. More
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 12.8 Defective solder joints. Note the poor solder joints on the left side of the component. Such defects can induce open circuits or create a short circuit if the solder forms a bridge between components. Solder spatter of the type shown here can also be induced by excess energy More
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Published: 01 April 2004
Fig. 3.6 Wetting of copper by Pb-63Sn solder using rosin flux. Soldering with flux generally benefits from a protective atmosphere (unless the atmosphere detrimentally affects the chemistry of the fluxing action), because the flux has to work less to protect the substrate and filler from More