1-20 of 432 Search Results for

sintering

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pmsspmp.t52000059
EISBN: 978-1-62708-312-6
... Abstract This chapter discusses the sintering process for stainless steel powders and its influence on corrosion resistance. It begins with a review of sintering furnaces and atmospheres and the effect of temperature and density on compact properties such as conductivity, ductility...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pmsspmp.t52000101
EISBN: 978-1-62708-312-6
... Abstract This chapter describes the most effective ways to improve the corrosion resistance of sintered stainless steels, including increasing alloy content, optimizing the sintering process, and the use of surface treatments and modifications. alloying element corrosion resistance...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 April 2020
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.bpapp.t59290169
EISBN: 978-1-62708-319-5
... Abstract After shaping and first-stage binder removal, the component (with remaining backbone binder) is heated to the sintering temperature. Further heating induces densification, evident as dimensional shrinkage, pore rounding, and improved strength. This chapter begins with a discussion...
Image
Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 25 Sintering process. (a) Schematic of sintering. (b) Scanning electron micrographs of the neck formation due to sintering. The spheres (33 μm diam) were sintered at 1030 °C for 30 min in vacuum. Courtesy of Randall M. German, The Pennsylvania State University. Source: Ref 11 More
Image
Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 8.27 Micrographs of tungsten during sintering. (a) Initial-stage sintering, with considerable residual porosity and small bonds between the particles. (b) Intermediate-stage sintering, where the pores are rounded and highly connected. (c) and (d) Final-stage sintering, with residual pores More
Image
Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 2-115 Sintering pallet with grate bars for sintering ore and fluxes for the blast furnace. Width of pallet, 6 ft (1.8 m). The grate bars of heat resistant cast steel are cast separately. More
Image
Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 6.18 Effect of sintering temperature on iron. Low-carbon iron mixed with 0.75% lubricant, pressed to a density of 6.5 g/cm 3 . Sintered in dissociated ammonia for 30 min. 2% nital. 300×. Sintering temperature: (a) As-pressed. (b) 1066 °C. (c) 1121 °C. (d) 1171 °C. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 8.31 Density of Ti-6Al-4V compacts after sintering. Conditions 5 and 7 used hydrided powder and show the highest, most uniform densities. More
Image
Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.8 Strength evolution at various temperatures during sintering, showing the in situ strength after 60 min hold. The greatest strength and resistance to distortion is near 1200 °C (2190 °F). Strength loss at higher temperatures is due to thermal softening. Below 600 °C (1110 °F More
Image
Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.10 Relative phase content at various sintering temperatures is indicated by the tie lines on the phase diagram for 17-4 PH stainless steel. Illustrated here are the tie lines at a carbon content of 0.036%. At this concentration, first delta ferrite forms near 1270 °C (2320 °F). By 1325 More
Image
Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.12 Tensile strength after sintering (vacuum and hydrogen) and heat treatment, plotted versus retained carbon content. This plot ignores density, grain size, and other factors, so only a range of properties is associated with each carbon level. More
Image
Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.13 Sintering time and temperature maps showing the sintered density and delta ferrite contents using gas-atomized powder. Source: Julien et al. ( Ref 3 ) More
Image
Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.19 Dilatometry sintering shrinkage for 10 μm 17-4 PH stainless steel powder, including both heating and cooling, comparing the computer-simulated dimensional change with the experimentally measured behavior. Source: Kwon et al. ( Ref 12 ) More
Image
Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.27 Temperature versus time trace for thermal debinding and sintering of a cemented carbide. The peak temperature of 1400 °C (2550 °F) is held for 1 h. The holds during heating are to enable composition control. Source: Andren ( Ref 16 ) More
Image
Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.36 Data for surface area loss and sintering shrinkage during constant rate heating (5 °C/min, or 9 °F/min). If sintering were only by surface diffusion, then there would be no shrinkage while surface area is eliminated. On the other hand, grain-boundary diffusion leads to surface area More
Image
Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.37 Sintered density versus hold temperature for 60 min sintering in air or vacuum, showing an advantage to vacuum More
Image
Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.38 Sintering time influence on densification for a slip cast 0.4 μm median particle size alumina, comparing a narrow and broad size distribution. At intermediate densities, the broad distribution improves sintering, but the two distributions converge to similar behavior at more than 95 More
Image
Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 4 Poor degree of sintering in P/M compact, unetched. Source: Ref 2 More
Image
Published: 01 June 2007
Fig. 4.13 Schematic representation of the effects of green density, sintering temperature, and sintering time on sintered density. Source: Ref 15 . Reprinted with permission from MPIF, Metal Powder Industries Federation, Princeton, NJ More
Image
Published: 01 June 2007
Fig. 5.2 Variation in compact properties with degree of sintering, as represented by sintering temperature. Source: Ref 2 . Reprinted with permission from MPIF, Metal Powder Industries Federation, Princeton, NJ More