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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mfadr7.t91110402
EISBN: 978-1-62708-247-1
... Abstract Cross-sectioning refers to the process of exposing the internal layers and printed devices below the surface by cleaving through the wafer. This article discusses in detail the steps involved in common cross-sectioning methods. These include sample preparation, scribing, indenting...
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 5.66 Scribing device mounted in one of the ports of the nosepiece. Before scribing, the specimen should be firmly mounted in clay on a glass or metal slide on the microscope stage. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 7 Types of scribers and scribing tips. a) Handheld scribers with 4-6” handles. b) Tip of diamond pen style scriber c) Wedge shaped diamond indenter from a tool with integrated weak point and cleaving d) Sharp tip from handheld diamond scribe (large lines shown on the scale are in mm More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 8 Tabletop back scribing More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 5 The short scribe is used for crystalline materials while the long scribe is used for amorphous materials or to cleave counter to a crystal plane. More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 9.9: Effects of friction and die angle on distortion of a vertical line scribed on the cross section of a round bar. More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 5.51 Photograph of a scribe device for the upright metallurgical microscope. The device fits into an objective port on the nosepiece. Note the offset diamond tip that is rotated to produce a scribed circle around the feature on the specimen surface. More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 6.26 An example of a scribed groove around a oxide stringer-type nonmetallic inclusion. 100× More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 10 Scribe on the edge of the sample. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 11 Copper film on (100) silicon cleaved after making a short scribe shows mirror finish edge. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 13 Sample cleaved at 45 degrees to (100) plane using a long scribe. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 15 Cleaving over an edge. (a) Lay the scribe mark with the sample parallel to the ruler edge; (b) Using forefingers, push on either side of the scribe mark to initiate the cleave. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 4 Weak points made by diamond scribers. a) microline indent made by an indent and cleaving system; b) handheld scribe, free hand; c-e) various scribes using a ruler as a straight edge. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Fig 11 Plan-view EBIC of 60x600 µm GaAs QW stripe laser which was intentionally damaged with two diamond scribes. Note the ❬100❭ DLDs that travel out of the scribes, and toward the lasing stripe (after [4] ). More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 17 (a) The portion of the sample to be used is positioned between the tweezers and the sample edge is scribed along the desired cleave line. The analyst then presses firmly on the top of sample. (b) The sample is cleaved in two pieces along the desired scribe line. More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 11.18: Expansion of surface area in back extrusion of a cup. (a) Expansion of a scribed ring; (b) effect of punch profile on the rate of expansion in extrusion of a steel can with 76.5% reduction. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 6 Cross-section of glass substrate showing: (a) the side of the substrate where the weak point was placed, (b) the area of the initiation scribe, and (c) the area away from the weak point where the cleave was allowed to propagate. More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 5.67 Micrographs of a small titanium nitride inclusion in A8 tool steel. (a) Surrounded by three circular scribe marks and (b) a closer view of the inner circle showing the inclusion (see arrow). Vilella’s etch. (a) 50× and (b) 300× More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mgppis.t60400109
EISBN: 978-1-62708-258-7
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mgppis.t60400149
EISBN: 978-1-62708-258-7
... that have been etched will not yield accurate results, because of the roughened and chemically altered surface. In an etched specimen, the metallographer must find the area of interest, mechanically scribe a circular groove around the area, and then lightly polish the specimen to remove the etch...