1-20 of 1079 Search Results for

scaling

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Image
Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 10 Effect of temperature and alloying on the scaling behavior of gray irons after 200 h at temperature in air. Source: Ref 19 Iron Type Chemical analysis, % TC Si Mn P Ni Cr Cu A Low-Si gray iron 2.98 1.14 1.07 0.18 … … … B Ni-Cr gray iron 3.45 1.64 More
Image
Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 22 Scaling losses developed in 12 intermittent heating and cooling cycles by various stainless steels More
Image
Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.156 SEM micrograph of the crack surface showing presence of scaling and microcracks, 1000× More
Image
Published: 01 March 2001
Fig. 8 Oxidation of steels in air at the temperature at which scaling is less than 10 mg/cm 2 . Source: Ref 22 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 8 Oxidation of steels in air at the temperature at which scaling is less than 10 mg/cm 2 . Source: Ref 5 More
Image
Published: 01 December 2000
Fig. 8.4 Scaling rates of titanium and some titanium alloys in air at various temperatures More
Image
Published: 01 November 2023
Fig. 1 Technology scaling trends until 2028 ( Ref 9 ). More-Moore Technology scaling roadmap, with lateral gate all-arounds (LGAA) predicted to be introduced in 2022 (node 3 nm), and complimentary field-effect transistor (CFET) in 2028 (node 1.5 nm). Copyright 2022 IEEE, Ref 9 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2023
Fig. 2 (a) Spatial resolution requirements with technology scaling trends until 2028. The required resolution (in blue) appears to flatten out at about 100 nm. The available microscope resolution (in green) tracks the required resolution well. With visible probing, the spatial resolution More
Image
Published: 01 November 2023
Fig. 3 More-than-Moore scaling with heterogeneous integration, such as 2.5D, die-on-die stacking such as the 3D, and disruptive backside power-delivery schemes introduced as early as 2025 ( Ref 29 ) More
Image
Published: 01 November 2023
Fig. 3 IMEC Technology scaling roadmap to iN3. BPR enables transition from 6T to 5T for 1 fin or nanosheet devices to reduce area by 17% without pitch scaling. Standard-cell track-height reduction enabled by BPR allows logic area to be scaled without requiring a reduction in minimum feature More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mfadr7.t91110016
EISBN: 978-1-62708-247-1
... Abstract Since the introduction of chip scale packages (CSPs) in the early 90s, they have continuously increased their market share due to their advantages of small form factor, cost effectiveness and PCB optimization. The reduced package size brings challenges in performing failure analysis...
Image
Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 4 Metal with oxide scale. (a) A protective scale that prevents gas access. (b) Schematic of electrochemical oxidation through a protective oxide scale that serves as electrolyte and electron lead. The case is for mobile cations More
Image
Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.28 (a) Dark brown scale on OD surface. (b) Brownish black scale on the ID surface of a tube More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 3.20 Heavy oxide scales formed on the side of Type 321 recuperator tube that was exposed to the incoming air after 6 months of service with the metal temperatures approximately 620 to 670 °C (1150 to 1240 °F). This tube was from the same batch of tubes that shows surface chromium More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 3.24 Scanning electron micrograph (backscattered image) showing the oxide scales formed on the outside diameter of Type 321 tube (from supplier B) exposed to air at approximately 620 to 670 °C (1150 to 1240 °F) for 1008 hours. EDX analysis was performed to determine the chemical More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 3.45 Scanning electron micrograph showing the adherent aluminum-rich oxide scale formed on alloy 214 after exposure in flowing air at 1320 °C (2400 °F) for 200 h with the specimen being cycled to room temperature every 24 h. EDX analysis was performed at three different locations, marked More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 3.47 Oxidation data in terms of metal loss, resulting from external oxide scales, and internal attack, resulting from internal oxide and/or void formation, for alumina-former alloy 214 and chromia/silica-former alloy HR160 along with several other nickel-and iron-base alloys, generated More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 3.58 Oxide scales formed on alloy 214 in a high-velocity gas stream (0.3 Mach velocity) with 30 min cycles at 1090 °C (2000 °F) for 500 h. Area 1: 96.5% Al, 1.5% Cr, 0.1% Fe, 1.9% Ni. Area 2: 75.2% Al, 6.2% Cr, 2.6% Fe, 16.0% Ni. Area 3: 95.8% Al, 1.0% Cr, 0.1% Fe, 3.1% Ni. Area 4: 53.0 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 3.71 Optical micrographs showing a thin oxide scale formed on Type 347 foil when tested in laboratory air after 40,000 h at 650 °C (1200 °F) (a) and (b) and thick unprotective oxide scales formed on Type 347 foil when tested in air containing 10% H 2 O after only 10,000 h at the same More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.5 Formation of internal aluminum nitrides beneath external oxide scales and internal oxides in alloy 601 after exposing to a furnace oxidizing atmosphere for approximately 4 to 5 years in a temperature range of 760 to 870 °C (1400 to 1600 °F). (a) Optical micrograph showing the external More