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Published: 30 April 2021
Fig. 2.11 Rolling a ball on a flat produces pure rolling at a point. Rolling a ball in an “almost” conforming raceway produces a line of rolling contact. More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.smfpa.t53500211
EISBN: 978-1-62708-317-1
... Abstract Roll forming is a process in which flat strip or sheet material is progressively bent as it passes through a series of contoured rollers. This chapter describes the basic configuration and operating principles of a roll forming line and the cross-sectional profiles that can be achieved...
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 9.6 Typical rolling mill designs used in rolling plate, sheet, strip, and foil More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 9.9 Two-high rolling mill. This type of mill lends itself to rolling titanium sheet and plate. Courtesy of Timet More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 9.10 Hot rolling converts slab material into a single longer piece that can be coiled at an intermediate-thickness hot band. Courtesy of Timet More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.74 Rolling of a metal sheet. (a) Elongation on surface of the sheet. (b) Resulting distribution of longitudinal residual stress over thickness of sheet (schematic). Note: The residual stress pattern would be the reverse of those shown here for large reduction of thickness. Source: Ref More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 10.13 Flexible roll forming mill prototype. Servomotors: (M1) for light rolling; (M2) for driving rolls; (M3) for rotating turn table; and (M4) for translating base table. (a) Turn table. (b) Base table. (c) Guide actuator. (d) Rotary encoder. (e) Linear encoder. (f) Blank sheet. (g More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 2.29 Evolution of grain structure in cold rolling and annealing. Source: Ref 2.1 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 15.21 Traditional flat rolling process More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 15.23 Thickness profile in flexible rolling. Source: Ref 15.1 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 15.26 Experimental pan made from flexible rolling blank. Source: Ref 15.10 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 15.27 Various applications of flexible rolling blanks. Source: Ref 15.10 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 12.51 Longitudinal cross section of fasteners presenting rolling folds or laps in different extents and locations. (a) Lap in the thread crest. (b) Lap close to the thread crest. (c) Lap in the thread root. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 12.58 (a) Defect that gave rise to the rupture, during cold rolling of a thin sheet of steel. (b) Longitudinal cross section of the sheet, tangential to the edge of one of the defects. The surface of the sheet is at the bottom of the image. The dark line is the crack, slightly opened More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 14.10 Plates of API X70, steel, produced through controlled rolling. Longitudinal cross section. (a) and (c), at 1/4 thickness (t/4 position). (b) and (d) mid-thickness (t/2 position). Ferrite (ferritic grain size ASTM 11) and fine pearlite. Some banding. Courtesy of ArcelorMittal Tubarão More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 14.11 Dual-phase API X100 steel for piping produced through controlled rolling. C = 0.06%, Mn = 1.96%, Nb = 0.04%, Ti = 0.01%, + Ni, Cu, Mo. Granular ferrite and bainite (martensite and retained austenite are also present). Courtesy of Nippon Steel Corporation. Source: Ref 11 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 14.12 Experimental API X120 steel produced by controlled rolling in accordance with the cycle presented in (c). Steel containing C ≅ 0.05%, Mn ≅ 1.95%, Mo ≅ 0.33%, B = 12 ppm and other additions, including titanium to prevent the formation of boron nitride. (a) Lower bainite. Quenching More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.69 Transverse cross section of a rolling mill roll. The cylinder surface (upper portion of the image) has been chilled. White cast iron region close to the roll surface, gray core, and mottled transition region. Etchant: iodine. More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 4 Schematic of pure rolling (ignoring elastic deformation). (a) When two rollers of different sizes but the same surface velocity (not rpm) contact in pure rolling, point A will contact point A’, then point B will contact B’, point C will contact point C’, and other points around More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 5 Schematic of rolling/sliding contact. (a) The situation shown in Fig. 4 changes drastically if the rollers are externally driven and forced to rotate with different surface velocities. The upper roller is driven at a higher surface velocity than the lower roller, which introduces More