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quench cracking

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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 7 Relationship between quench cracking frequency and martensite start (M s ) temperature. Source: Ref 8 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 8 Relationship between quench cracking frequency and austenitic grain size. Source: Ref 8 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 9 Relationship between carbon equivalent (C eq ) and quench cracking frequency. Source: Ref 8 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 20 Design solutions to the quench-cracking problem often encountered in shaft hardening over a cross hole. Source: Ref 19 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 27 Two forms of quench cracking. Source: Ref 32 More
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Published: 30 April 2024
Fig. 11.2 Quench cracks formed in oil-quenched tool steel die. Cracks originated from the sharp corners of the keyway and from holes that were located too close to the surface. More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 16 Examples of quench cracks. (a) Micrograph of AISI 4340 quenched and tempered steel illustrating a macroetched pure quench crack. (b) Micrograph of AISI 4142 steel as-quenched and tempered. The microstructure is tempered martensite with quench cracking at the fillet radius. Original More
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Published: 30 April 2024
Fig. 11.17 Microstructure of quench crack. The crack follows the former austenite grain boundaries. More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 25 Quench crack promoted by the presence of a deep, sharp stamp mark in a die made of AISI S7 tool steel. Source: Ref 16 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 26 A 4140 grade steel seamless tubing that failed because of quench cracks. (a) Cross section of tube showing extensive cracking revealed by dye-penetrant inspection. (b) SEM micrograph showing intergranular fracture at a crack origin. Original magnification: 90×. (c) SEM micrograph More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 35 Schematic of quench crack formation. Source: Ref 19 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 24 Quench crack with typical geometry More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.59 Quenching crack susceptibility as a function of the “equivalent carbon” used as a measure for hardenability. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.62 Quench crack in prior austenitic grain boundaries. During heating for quenching there was excessive austenitic grain growth. Etchant: nital 2%. Courtesy of M.M. Souza, Neumayer-Tekfor, Jundiaí, Brazil. More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 10.5 Impingement of martensite plates leading to quench cracks (QC) More
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Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 21 Quench cracks due to excessively large grain boundaries resulting from excessively high austenitizing temperature. Note cracking patterns associated with prior coarse austenite grain boundaries. Source: Ref 25 More
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Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 9.8 Quench cracks in axle shaft flange radius. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 9.9 Quench crack in induction-hardened shoulder. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 9.10 Quench crack at spline end of axle shaft. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 9.11 Quench crack in machined groove on a shaft. Source: Ref 4 More