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potential-pH diagram

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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 7 Potential-pH diagram for copper More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 8 Potential-pH diagram for aluminum More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 10 Potential-pH diagram for titanium More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 3 The concept of cathodic protection related to a potential-pH diagram (left) and to electrochemical polarization curves (right) More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 15 Concept of anodic protection related to a potential-pH diagram (left) and to an electrochemical polarization curve (right) More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 13.3 Pourbaix (potential-pH) diagram for the titanium-water system at 25 °C (77 °F). More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 14.2 Potential-pH diagram for titanium-water system at 85 °C (185 °F). Chloride ion activity is 10. All other ionic activities are 10 5 . emf, electromotive force; SHE, standard hydrogen electrode More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 6 Potential-pH diagram for titanium More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 5.1 Schematic potential-pH diagram for a corrosion-resistant alloy indicating different regimes of environmentally assisted cracking. For simplicity, only the regions of iron stability are shown. More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 7.4 Potential pH diagram for a system of copper and a water solution with 1.0 g·mol/L of ammonia partly as ammonium sulfate and 0.05 g·atom/L of dissolved copper added as sulfate at 25 °C (77 °F). Numbers refer to equations from Ref 7.9 . The shaded zone marks solution properties More
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Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 7.38 Potential-pH diagram for the ternary system Cu-Cl-H 2 O at 25 °C (355 ppm Cl – ). Source: Ref 56 More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 3 Potential-pH diagram for water More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 14 Methods of corrosion control for iron related to the potential-pH diagram More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 13 Potential-pH diagram showing the domains of failure mode for 70Cu-30Ni brass in various solutions, together with the calculated positions of various boundaries relating to the domains of stability of different chemical species More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 14 Potential-pH diagram (Pourbaix) for iron in water at 25 °C (77 °F). A decrease in pH from 9 to 6 at potential of –0.2 V, which shifts iron from a region of stability to one of active corrosion, is indicated by the solid bar. More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 1.15 Potential-pH diagrams showing the domains of failure mode for 70Cu-30Zn brass in various solutions, together with the calculated positions of various boundaries relating to the domains of stability of different chemical species More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 7 Simplified potential-pH diagrams for iron at 25 °C (75 °F) showing (a) areas of immunity (no corrosion), passivity, and corrosion, and (b) reaction/corrosion products produced More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 8 Potential-pH diagrams for iron and gold. The broad-banded, cross hatched area in the iron E -pH diagram represents a region of passivity. The narrow-banded cross-hatched areas represent where iron and gold will corrode. More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 9 Potential-pH diagrams for iron and copper. A, aerated; D, deaerated More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 10 Potential-pH diagrams for iron and zinc More