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Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ems.t53730099
EISBN: 978-1-62708-283-9
... Abstract This chapter discusses the structural classifications, molecular configuration, degradation, properties, and uses of polymers. It describes thermoplastic and thermosetting polymers, degree of polymerization, branching, cross-linking, and copolymers. It also discusses glass transition...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ffub.t53610327
EISBN: 978-1-62708-303-4
... Abstract This chapter covers the fatigue and fracture behaviors of ceramics and polymers. It discusses the benefits of transformation toughening, the use of ceramic-matrix composites, fracture mechanisms, and the relationship between fatigue and subcritical crack growth. In regard to polymers...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fdsm.t69870325
EISBN: 978-1-62708-344-7
...Physical and mechanical properties of polymers used in accelerated fatigue evaluation study Table 12.1 Physical and mechanical properties of polymers used in accelerated fatigue evaluation study Property Polymer Polypropylene Nylon 6/6 Polycarbonate Polymer structure...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cfap.t69780276
EISBN: 978-1-62708-281-5
... Abstract This article briefly reviews abrasive and adhesive wear failure of reinforced polymers and polymer composites, namely particulate-filled polymers, short-fiber-reinforced polymers, polymers with continuous fibers, and mixed reinforcements and fabrics. It includes scanning electron...
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 7 Typical creep and creep rupture curves for polymers. (a) Ductile polymers. (b) Brittle polymers More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 2.8 Conventional polymer and liquid crystal–like aramid polymers. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 3.4 Contrasting cooling curves for amorphous and crystalline polymers. A crystalline polymer has a volume change at the melting temperature, T M , during slow cooling, but an amorphous polymer reaches a brittle condition below the glass transition temperature, T g . More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 3.6 Summary of the repeating unit structures for common polymers. The degree of polymerization depends on the number of repeating units. More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 17.2 Thermal conductivity and expansion of metals in relation to polymers, ceramics, and composites. Source: Adapted from Ref 17.7 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 17.3 Elastic modulus vs. tensile yield strength of metals and polymers. The plot of ceramic strength is their compressive yield strength, because brittle ceramics are not suitable in applications with tensile stress. Elastomer strength is tear strength. The symbol σ f is used More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 9.1 Structure of several linear polymers. Kevlar is a registered tradename of E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company. Source: Ref 9.1 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 9.9 Tacticity of linear polymers. Ref 9.1 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 14.1 Recycling symbols for polymers. (1) Polyethylene terephthalate, also indicated by PET and called polyester. (2) High-density polyethylene (also PE-HD).(3) Polyvinyl chloride, or PVC. (4) Low-density polyethylene (PE-LD), or LLDPE for very-low-density polyethylene. (5) Polypropylene More
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Published: 15 June 2021
Fig. 8 Pneumatic grips for soft polymers and elastomers More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 2.22 The entropy elasticity of chain polymers. An spring is also an example of entropy elasticity. However, the entropy increases when air expands, contrary to the case of rubber. (a) The shorter x is, the larger entropy becomes. (b) The elastic coefficients of various matters More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 12.5 Softening patterns for various polymers tested under strain control at room temperature. (a) Polycarbonate ( Ref 12.2 ). (b) Nylon ( Ref 12.2 ). (c) Polypropylene ( Ref 12.3 ). (d) ABS plastic ( Ref 12.3 ) More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 12.9 Monotonic and cyclic stress-strain curves for several polymers at room temperature (298 K). Source: Ref 12.3 (a) Polyoxymethylene. (b) Polypropylene. (c) Nylon More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 12.10 Schematic representation of the general fatigue response of polymers in terms of strain range versus number of cycles to failure. Source: Ref 12.3 More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 12.11 Completely reversed strain cycling fatigue of various polymers. Source: Ref 12.3 . (a) Polycarbonate at room temperature. (b) Polycarbonate at 78 K. (c) Polystyrene at room temperature. (d) Polymethyl methacrylate at room temperature. More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 12.12 Hysteresis loops for three polymers cycled at various strain ranges. (a) Polypropylene at 298 K, Δε t = 8% ( Ref 12.4 ). (b) Nylon 6/6 at 298 K, Δε t = 12% ( Ref 12.3 ). (c) Polycarbonate at 298 K, Δε t = 10% ( Ref 12.3 ) More