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plain carbon steels

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.emea.t52240349
EISBN: 978-1-62708-251-8
... steel: the electric arc furnace and the basic oxygen furnace. It also provides information on the classification and specifications for various steels, namely, plain carbon steels, low-carbon steels, medium-carbon plain carbon steels, and high-carbon plain carbon steels. The chapter concludes...
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 5 Effects of carbon content on the microstructures of plain-carbon steels. (a) Ferrite grains (white) and pearlite (gray streaks) in a white matrix of a hypoeutectoid steel containing 0.4% C. 1000×. (b) Microstructure (all pearlite grains) of a eutectoid steel containing 0.77% C. 2000 More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 11.20 Effect of carbon content on tempering of plain carbon steels. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 15 Effect of carbon content on tempering of plain carbon steels. Source: Ref 8 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.phtpclas.9781627083539
EISBN: 978-1-62708-353-9
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.23 Austenite decomposition products for plain carbon steels during isothermal transformation (quenching and holding) at various temperatures below A 1 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 5.9 Charpy V-notch (CVN) data on plain carbon steels austenitized at 870°C (1600°F) for 4 h and slow cooled. Source: Ref 5.3 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 9.3 Isothermal transformation diagrams for plain carbon steels 1021, 1060, and 1080 showing the effects of increasing %C. Source: Ref 9.2 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 12.4 Hardness of several plain carbon steels after isothermal quenching. All steels are 0.80 to 0.90% Mn except 1095 and 10113, which are 0.30% Mn. Source: Ref 12.9 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 9.19 Microconstituents formed in plain carbon steels on rapid quenching from austenite into isothermal baths at the temperatures shown. Source: Ref 9.2 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 7.9 Hardness of plain carbon steels after tempering at various temperatures for 30 min. Source: Ref 7.4 More
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Published: 01 June 2007
Fig. 8.9 Effect of porosity on Young’s modulus of sintered plain carbon steels for three different sintering times (5, 60, and 240 min). Source: Ref 24 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 13 Hardness as a function of tempering temperature for plain carbon steels. Source: Ref 6 More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 3.13 Discontinuous yielding in plain carbon steels. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 12.8 Discontinuous yielding in plain carbon steels. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 8 Discontinuous yielding in plain carbon steels. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 December 1996
Fig. 5-2 The effect of tempering temperature on the hardness of plain carbon steels. The tempering time was 1 hour. (Adapted from G.R. Speich, Trans. Met. Soc. AIME , Vol 245, p 2553 (1969), Ref 3 ) More
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Published: 01 December 1996
Fig. 5-3 Hardness of plain carbon steels as a function of tempering temperature. (Adapted from M.A. Grossmann and E.C. Bain, Principles of Heat Treatment , American Society for Metals, Metals Park, Ohio (1964), Ref 4 ) More
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Published: 01 December 1996
Fig. 5-26 The effect of tempering temperature on the hardness of plain carbon steels, showing the tempering stages. The tempering time was one hour. (Adapted from G.R. Speich, Trans. Met. Soc. AIME , Vol 245, p 2553 (1969)) More
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Published: 01 December 1996
Fig. 5-28 (Part 1) Tempering data for several plain carbon steels plotted parametrically. The structure was all martensite prior to tempering. (From J.H. Holloman and L.D. Jaffe, Trans. AIME , Vol 162, p 223 (1945), Ref 2 ) More