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pitting corrosion

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Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cpi2.t55030033
EISBN: 978-1-62708-282-2
... Abstract This chapter concentrates on the better-known and widely studied phenomenon of pitting corrosion of passive metals. The discussion focuses on different parameters that influence pitting corrosion, namely environment, metal composition, potential, temperature, surface condition...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.caaa.t67870045
EISBN: 978-1-62708-299-0
... Abstract Pitting is the most common corrosion attack on aluminum alloy products. This chapter explains why pitting occurs and how it appears in different types of aluminum. It discusses pitting rates, pitting potentials, and pitting resistance as well as testing and prevention methods. It also...
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Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 7.1 Examples of pitting corrosion. (a) Pitting and subsequent cracking in a chromium-plated copper sink-drain trap. (b) Pitting in a stainless steel thermos-bottle liner. (c) Pitting in a brass condensate line. (d) Mounds (or tubercles) associated with microbiologically influenced More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 2 Pitting corrosion of an aluminum alloy 2014–T6 sheet. Pitting occurred during the manufacturing cycle. Note the intergranular nature of the pit. 150× More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 13 Comparison between general corrosion and localized (pitting) corrosion data recorded from a dehydrated gas pipeline environment. Source: Ref 59 More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 25 Pitting corrosion in 90Cu-10Ni tubes from a fan cooler in a nuclear power plant. Pits are located under the small deposits associated with the deposition of iron and manganese by bacteria. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 26 Pitting corrosion in Monel tubes from a heat exchanger. Each pit was originally covered by a discrete deposit containing large numbers of SRB. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 18 Pitting corrosion associated with stainless steel wire brush cleaning on the back of a type 316L stainless steel test coupon after bleach plant exposure. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 2 Barnacle mechanism of sour pitting corrosion. Source: Ref 22 More
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Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 22 Pitting corrosion resistance of base metal relative to weld metal placed in 6 wt% FeCI 3 solution for 24 h per ASTM G 48 (method A). Source: Ref 35 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 12.13 (a) Optical micrograph showing slight pitting corrosion attack on alloy 625 overlay in an alloy 625 spiral overlay superheater tube after about 6.5 months of service. Micrograph (a) also shows the fusion boundary and substrate carbon steel. (b) Higher-magnification view of one More
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Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 7.32 (a) Pitting corrosion of inner wall of boiler tube due to insufficient deaeration of feedwater. Corrosion products brush removed from right side of section. (b) Cross section of pipe wall showing distribution of pits More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 3 Plots of (a) the maximum depth of pitting corrosion on 3003 alloy sheet and (b) of the percent loss in strength resuiting from exposure to seacoast atmosphere at Point Judith, Rl. Both curves show the self-stopping nature of pitting corrosion of aluminum but at different rates of change More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 34 Pitting corrosion associated with stainless steel wire brush cleaning on the back of a type 316L stainless steel test coupon after bleach plant exposure. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 9 Pitting corrosion resistance of base metal relative to weld metal placed in 6 wt % FeCl 3 solution for 24 h duration per ASTM 648 (method A). Source: Ref 14 More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 1 Comparison of pitting and intergranular corrosion morphologies. (a) Pitting-type corrosion in the surface of an aircraft wing plank from an alloy 7075–T6 extrusion. (b) Intergranular corrosion in alloy 7075–T6 plate. Grain boundaries were attacked, causing the grains to separate. Both More
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Published: 01 June 2007
Fig. 38 Pitting type corrosion in PM 409L (welded) subjected to condensed corrosion test for 25 cycles (25 weeks). An adherent layer of corrosion products is seen on the sample surface. Sample as-made by hydrogen sintering to 7.20 g/cc density. (See section 11.1 , 3 for test procedure More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 9 Effects of applied potential and corrosion potential on the pitting- and crevice-corrosion initiation time for alloy 825 in 1000 ppm Cl − at 95 °C (203 °F). Note that at and below the repassivation potential, E rp no initiation occurs out to at least three years. Source: Ref 40 More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 1 Corrosion resistance (pitting) as a function of salinity and temperature. 1. 304L (UNS S30403); 2. 316L (UNS S31603); 3. 2205 (UNS S32205); 4. 904L (UNS N08904); 5. 254SMO (UNS S31254). Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 23 Differences in corrosion rate and modality—(a) pitting and (b) general corrosion—as determined by automated, real-time electrochemical corrosion monitoring system using linear polarization resistance, electrochemical noise, and harmonic distortion analysis. Note comparison More