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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.caaa.t67870045
EISBN: 978-1-62708-299-0
... Abstract Pitting is the most common corrosion attack on aluminum alloy products. This chapter explains why pitting occurs and how it appears in different types of aluminum. It discusses pitting rates, pitting potentials, and pitting resistance as well as testing and prevention methods. It also...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cpi2.t55030033
EISBN: 978-1-62708-282-2
... Abstract This chapter concentrates on the better-known and widely studied phenomenon of pitting corrosion of passive metals. The discussion focuses on different parameters that influence pitting corrosion, namely environment, metal composition, potential, temperature, surface condition...
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 11 Cavitation pitting fatigue. (a) Cavitation pitting on a gray cast iron diesel-engine cylinder sleeve. The pitted area is several inches long, and the pits nearly penetrated the thickness of the sleeve. Note the clustered appearance of the pits at preferred locations. (b) Cavitation More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 25 Cavitation pitting fatigue. (a) Cavitation pitting on a gray cast iron diesel engine cylinder sleeve. The pitted area is several inches long, and the pits nearly penetrated the thickness of the sleeve. Note the clustered appearance of the pits at preferred locations. (b) Cavitation More
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Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 7.1 Examples of pitting corrosion. (a) Pitting and subsequent cracking in a chromium-plated copper sink-drain trap. (b) Pitting in a stainless steel thermos-bottle liner. (c) Pitting in a brass condensate line. (d) Mounds (or tubercles) associated with microbiologically influenced More
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Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 7.22 Correlation between the critical pitting temperature and critical pitting potential of 17 high-performance alloys. The alloys are: (1) 317LM, (2) 3RE60, (3) AF22, (4) 44LN, (5) FERRALIUM ALLOY 255, (6) 20CB-3 Alloy, (7) URANUS 86, (8) 2545LX, (9) JESSOP 700, (10) JESSOP 777, (11 More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 1 Comparison of pitting and intergranular corrosion morphologies. (a) Pitting-type corrosion in the surface of an aircraft wing plank from an alloy 7075–T6 extrusion. (b) Intergranular corrosion in alloy 7075–T6 plate. Grain boundaries were attacked, causing the grains to separate. Both More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 2 Pitting corrosion of an aluminum alloy 2014–T6 sheet. Pitting occurred during the manufacturing cycle. Note the intergranular nature of the pit. 150× More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 25 Variation of critical pitting temperature with pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) of austenitic steels in water plus 6% FeCl e . Source: Ref 26 More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 23 Critical pitting temperature versus pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN); SUS 329J4L = S31260, YUS 270 = S31254. Source: Ref 26 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 16.4 Erosion pitting caused by turbulent river water flowing through copper pipe. The typical horseshoe-shaped pits point upstream. Original magnification: 0.5×. Source: Ref 16.2 More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 2 Subsurface-origin pitting fatigue. (a) Sketch showing usual origin slightly below the surface where the shear stress is high. The fatigue cracks, which usually originate at stress concentrations such as hard, brittle inclusions, propagate parallel and perpendicular to the surface. When More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 9 Surface-origin pitting fatigue. (a) Typical surface deterioration due to pitting fatigue on gear teeth. In a standard gear system, the pitch line is near the center of the height of the teeth. Pitting fatigue usually starts slightly below the pitch line and then rapidly spreads More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 12 Mechanism of cavitation pitting fatigue. Serial sketches show a metal wall vibrating to the right and left against a liquid, which in all cases is to the right of the wall. The events shown can occur in a very short time, on the order of microseconds. (a) The metal moves to the right More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 10.8 Close-up view of a waterwall carbon steel tube showing pitting attack after 1 year of service in a subcritical unit in the United States, burning coal containing about 3.0 to 3.5% S and about 300 to 400 ppm chlorine. Source: Ref 14 . Courtesy of Welding Services Inc. More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.92 Schematic showing mechanism of oxygen pitting More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.96 (a) ID surface showing banded ferrite-pearlite and shallow pitting, 200×. (b) Microstructure of ferrite and pearlite with scale at the ID edge, 200× More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 12 (a) Damage involving both plastic flow and destructive pitting on teeth of a carburized AMS 6260 steel gear. (b) Etched end face of the gear, showing excessive stock removal from drive faces of teeth More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 5 (a) Pitting of a carbon steel pipe exposed to a strong mineral acid. (b) Close-up view shows the narrow pit mouths and the pronounced undercutting. Source: Nalco Chemical Company More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 3 Effect of molybdenum content on the FeCl 3 critical pitting temperature of commercial stainless steels. The more resistant steels have higher critical pitting temperatures More