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phenolic resins

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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 8 Specific wear rates for phenolic resin and its composites. The data are reported for various experimental conditions and pv (pressure × velocity) factors, as reported in the literature. Specimen Sliding speed ( v ), m/s Normal pressure ( p ) Counterface roughness ( R More
Image
Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 9 Micrograph of the worn surface for a phenolic resin/aramid fiber composite ( Ref 29 ) showing partial coverage of the polymer pin by transfer film More
Image
Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 12 Infrared spectrum of nitrile phenolic resin More
Image
Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 1.13 Cross sections of honeycomb node areas showing the number of phenolic resin dip coats. (a) Transmitted light, 100× objective. (b) Void in the node area. Transmitted-light phase contrast, 100× objective More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870063
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0
..., epoxy, bismaleimide, cyanate ester, polyimide, and phenolic resins and various toughening methods. The chapter also covers thermoplastic matrix materials and product forms and provides an introduction to the physiochemical tests used to characterize resins and cured laminates. physiochemical test...
Image
Published: 01 June 1983
; 5c — glass-phenolic-resin composite; 6a — phenolformaldehyde; 6b — polytetrafluoroethylene-2; 6c —perspex plastic-2; 7 — polyglycol; 8a — polytetrafluoroethylene-3; 8b — polyethylene terephthalate; 9a — polyester urethane; 9b — polyisobatylene. More
Image
Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 7.19 Six sheet specimens (with spacers) mounted in castable epoxy (a) and thermosetting phenolic resin (b). Note the damage caused by the pressure of the thermosetting mounting process. 2× More
Image
Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 7.18 Microstructure of a low-carbon steel sheet that was electroless nickel plated on both sides. (a) Specimen mounted in epoxy. (b) Specimen mounted in thermosetting phenolic resin. Note the damage in (b) due to the thermal-compression mounting process. Unetched. 100× More
Image
Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 7.22 Micrographs showing the polished edge of a steel screw mounted in thermosetting epoxy (a) and thermosetting phenolic resin (Bakelite) (b). Note the excellent edge retention of the epoxy mount where a thin oxide layer can be seen on the screw surface. The edge of the screw More
Image
Published: 01 December 2003
29 84 5 13 PTFE 1.2 … 0.2 … … … … 11 14 UHMWPE 0.05 0.5 … 5 0.73 … … 12 15 HDPE 0.9 0.03 … 2.8 0.41 … … 14 16 Polyethylene 1.2 … 0.09 … … … … 11 17 Phenolic resin 0.05 5.6 … 0.84 0.12 … … 18 PMMA, polymethyl methacrylate More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cfap.t69780267
EISBN: 978-1-62708-281-5
... polymers, very high wear resistance. Extremely poor wear resistance is demonstrated by polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polystyrene (PS), and phenolic resin. Figure 4 shows worn surfaces of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) ( Ref 19 ) and UHMWPE ( Ref 20 ). These polymer surfaces show scars of wear by plowing...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870401
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0
... resins are the most widely used matrix systems, and they have multiple sites for hydrogen bonding for water molecules, such as hydroxyl groups, phenol groups, amine groups, and sulfone groups. Water molecules become attached to the main molecular chains and also form secondary crosslinking in the manner...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mgppis.t60400169
EISBN: 978-1-62708-258-7
... to reveal the prior austenite boundaries. Therefore, a phenolic resin should not be used as a mounting medium because the hot etchant will attack and swell the mount to the point where its surface will be above the polished steel surface. In this case, the metallographer may choose a thermosetting epoxy...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870255
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0
... cores, such as glass or aramid, must be held in the expanded position and dipped in a liquid resin, which then must be cured before the expansion force can be released. Although epoxy and polyester resin systems are possible, phenolic and to some extent polyimide for higher-temperature applications...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cfap.t69780115
EISBN: 978-1-62708-281-5
...–65 Melamine-formaldehyde 150 298 100 210 … … … Phenolic resins 120–175 250–350 120–175 250–350 0.12–0.24 0.072–0.144 25–60 Polyester resins 50–205 120–400 120–150 250–300 0.17–0.22 0.10–0.13 55–100 Polyimide resins 305–360 580–680 260–315 500–600 0.10–0.34 0.058...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cfap.t69780003
EISBN: 978-1-62708-281-5
... polymerization of different monomers. Engineering plastics all have, as their principal constituent, one or more synthetic polymer resins and almost universally contain additives. Additives, which have much smaller molecules than polymers, provide color, flexibility, rigidity, flame resistance, weathering...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.omfrc.t53030223
EISBN: 978-1-62708-349-2
... the resin intermingling of the epoxy-based surfacing film with the epoxy matrix in the carbon fiber prepreg. Inset B shows the Nomex core and the phenolic resin coatings on the core cell wall, with the film adhesive fillet that bonds the core to the prepreg skins. Inset C shows the intermingling of the film...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.gmpm.t51250077
EISBN: 978-1-62708-345-4
...%), and MoS 2 (up to 15%). Phenolics Phenolics are injection molded resins compounded with various mineral and glass fillers, glass fibers, and lubricants such as PTFE and graphite. Phenolics are used in applications requiring dimensional stability improved heat resistance. Laminated Phenolic...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.lmub.t53550325
EISBN: 978-1-62708-307-2
.... The chapter also includes a section on the uses of thermoplastic and thermosetting resins and provides information on fabrication processes and fastening and joining methods. engineering plastics joining thermal properties AN ENGINEERING PLASTIC can be defined as a synthetic polymer capable...
Book Chapter

By M. B. Kasen
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 1983
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mlt.t62860413
EISBN: 978-1-62708-348-5
..., fine weave, phenolic resin NEMA/ASTM C MIL-P-15035, type FBM Cellulose fabric, medium weave, phenolic resin NEMA/ASTM G-5 — Glass fabric, melamine resin NEMA/ASTM G-10 MIL-P-18177, type GEE Glass fabric, epoxy resin NEMA/ASTM G-11 MIL-P-18177, type GEB Glass fabric, high-temperature...