1-20 of 712 Search Results for

penetration

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Image
Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 84 Cross section simplified view of the e-beam penetration volume and interactions with the sample. The primary e-beam creates (1) secondary electrons, (2) absorbed current, (3) heating throughout the penetration volume, and if the e-beam reaches the silicon layer, (4) EBIC currents More
Image
Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 85 E-beam penetration depth as a function of acceleration voltage for silicon, SiO2, copper, and tungsten. This plot and data were taken from [11] . More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.86 Depth of penetration of pack carburizing as a function of treatment time. Transversal cross sections, etched with nital and illuminated with oblique lighting. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 19.7 Copper (copper-colored features) penetration adjacent to high temperature oxidized crack in a medium carbon steel. As polished surface, light micrograph More
Image
Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 6.18 A SEM backscattered electron micrograph of oxide scale penetration on the surface of an AISI/SAE 1045 steel. The dark-gray-appearing constituent is silicon-rich iron oxide (fayalite-Fe 2 SiO 4 ), the medium gray constituent is iron oxide (wustite-FeO), and the light gray constituent More
Image
Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 17 Hardness penetration diagram. (a) Method of taking hardness traverse. (b) Plot of results of averaging several hardness traverses and mirror image. Source: Ref 1 More
Image
Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 1 Possible carbon penetration profiles from boost/diffuse cycles. Source: Ref 1 More
Image
Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 22 Standard depths of penetration as a function of frequencies used in eddy current inspection for several metals of various electrical conductivities. Source: Ref 3 More
Image
Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 13 Ultrasonic scanning procedure for full penetration groove weld (a) and double fillet welds (b) in corner joints. Source: Ref 1 More
Image
Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 19 Incomplete penetration of filler metal (BAg-1) in a brazed joint between copper components. 20×. Source: Ref 1 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 2.7 Effect of depth of flux layer on shape and penetration of submerged arc surface welds made at 800 A. (a) Flux layer too shallow, resulting in arc breakthrough (from loss of shielding), shallow penetration, and weld porosity or cracking. (b) Flux layer at correct depth for good weld More
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 4.13 Single-pass deep-penetration autogenous laser butt weld in 14 mm (9/16 in.) A-710 steel plate. Macrograph shows the high depth-to-width ratio of the weld bead and the limited size of the heat-affected zone. Source: Ref 4.8 More
Image
Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 12.10 Effect of draw bead penetration, tool gap, and punch radius on springback of steel. Source: Ref 12.3 More
Image
Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 12.11 Effect of draw bead penetration, tool gap, and die radius on curl radius of steel. Source: Ref 12.2 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 3.53 Oxidation penetration (metal loss + internal attack) as a function of test temperature for 1 year in air for a variety of commercial alloys. Source: Ref 15 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 6.41 Depth of internal penetration as a function of time ( h 0.5 ) for alloy 800H tested at 927 °C (1700 °F) in (a) argon 20% O 2 , 0.25% Cl 2 and (b) argon 20% CO 2 , 0.25% Cl 2 . Source: Ref 45 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 6.48 The metal loss and internal penetration for nickel-base alloys (alloys 214, 600, and 601) and cobalt-base alloys (alloys 25 and 188) along with Fe-Ni-Co-Cr alloy (alloy 556), Fe-Ni-Cr alloy (alloy 800H), and Type 310SS tested in Ar-5.5O 2 -1HCl-1SO 2 at 900 °C (1650 °F) for 800 h More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 6.52 Corrosion rates in terms of metal loss and internal penetration for nickel- and cobalt-base alloys at 900 °C (1650 °F) in Ar-4HCl-4H 2 . Data was based on 8 h tests. Source: Ref 35 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 6.53 Internal penetration in terms of voids for various iron- and nickel-base alloys after testing in 900 °C (1650 °F) for 8 h in Ar-4H 2 -4HCl. Source: Ref 55 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 6.72 Depth of internal fluoride penetration for alloys tested in Ar-5HF at 1000 °C (1832 °F) for 15 h. Source: Ref 76 More