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particle impact velocity

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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 3.18 Variation of the particle impact velocity for copper particles of different sizes (data points numerically calculated) compared to values obtained from the fit functions Eq 3.11 and 3.12 . The calculation parameters are given in Ref 3.5 . More
Image
Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 3.11 Critical impact velocity for a 25 µm particle calculated for different materials with Eq 3.4 . Source: Ref 3.19 More
Image
Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 3.12 Variation of the critical impact velocity with particle size for copper. The solid lines correspond to the analytical model in Ref 3.5 , while the dotted lines show the upper limit of the critical velocity, corresponding to zero adiabaticity. The particle temperature upon impact More
Image
Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 3.24 Impact and critical velocities as a function of particle diameter calculated for two different process conditions in cold spraying of copper. Note that typical particle size ranges and deposition efficiencies are different for the two cases. DE, deposition efficiency. Source: Ref More
Image
Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 2.21 Particle velocity and critical velocity for given process parameters as a function of particle size (schematic). Successful deposition is possible only if the particle impact velocity exceeds the critical velocity. Thus, the powder size distribution should be in the range between More
Image
Published: 01 June 2016
particle and substrate for particle impact velocities of 500 and 525 m/s (1640 and 1720 ft/s), which is above the critical velocity for formation of adiabatic shear instabilities (ASI). The point is chosen to be in the region of ASI. The temperature profile along the interface in (a) in principle also More
Image
Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 2.2 Schematic of the mass change respective to the deposition efficiency with particle impact velocity, illustrating the concept of critical velocity. v crit denotes the velocity above which deposition takes place; v erosion marks the transition to hydrodynamic effects that cause More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.hpcspa.t54460067
EISBN: 978-1-62708-285-3
... solid mechanics fluid dynamics process modeling process simulation A CENTRAL CONCEPT IN COLD SPRAYING of metallic materials is that deposition takes place if the particle velocity upon impact, v p , becomes greater than a critical velocity, v cr ( Ref 3.1 – 3.4 ). A further conjecture...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.hpcspa.t54460017
EISBN: 978-1-62708-285-3
... ratio of the spray nozzle. Particle impact velocities depend on the acceleration in the surrounding gas jet, which is governed by the gas velocity, the related drag forces by the gas density or pressure, the nozzle length, and the powder mass. The particle temperature upon impact depends on various...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fibtca.t52430314
EISBN: 978-1-62708-253-2
... resulting in a jetting effect, the presence of hard abrasive particles in the flowing fluid, or direct impingement of hard particles on a metal surface. The extent of metal loss is governed by the type of erodent (solid or liquid), its velocity and impingement angle, the nature of the impacted surface...
Image
Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 2.17 (a) Two-dimensional simulation results of the impact of Cu onto a rigid substrate showing the velocity vectors for each volume cell for an impact velocity of 500 m/s (1650 ft/s). At the interface between particle and substrate, the flow direction is outward. (b) Single impact More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.hpcspa.t54460001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-285-3
... in cold spray the impact velocity of the spray particles must exceed a critical minimum to produce a hydrodynamic shear instability at the bond interface that is essential for good bonding. If the impact velocity is too low, the particles will simply rebound and abrade the surface, much as in conventional...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 April 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.tpsfwea.t59300079
EISBN: 978-1-62708-323-2
..., as they are in abrasive blasting. This is probably the most common example of solid particle erosion. As with most all erosion processes, the rate of the erosion is a function of the mass of the impacting particles and their velocity. E ∼ m v n H where m is the mass of particles impacting, v...
Image
Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 3.25 Window of deposition illustrated on the plane of particle velocity and particle temperature for titanium powder sprayed with nitrogen and nozzle type D24 at 4 MPa (580 psi). The data points show impact conditions corresponding to particles of different sizes: (A) 10, (B) 25, and (C More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.omfrc.t53030193
EISBN: 978-1-62708-349-2
...× objective Fig. 11.11 Micrograph of crack propagation through a dispersed-phase, rubber-toughened thermoset-matrix composite after impact. Transmitted-light phase contrast, 40× objective Fig. 11.12 Fracture morphology in a particle interlayer-toughened thermoset-matrix composite...
Image
Published: 01 June 2016
expansion ratios, and longer nozzle lengths account for higher particle velocities. Low particle impact temperatures are mainly due to larger expansion ratios and longer nozzle lengths. More
Image
Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 3.4 Temporal development of (a) plastic strain and (b) temperature at a point on the surface of an impinging particle for various impact velocities. There is a change in trend of variation of these variables with time as the initial particle velocity is increased from 550 to 580 m/s (1800 More
Image
Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 2.5 Calculated temperature profiles along a meridian path on a copper particle surface impacting onto a copper substrate, for different impact velocities. The distance from the south pole has been weighted in a way to scale with the corresponding contact area. The arrows indicate the edge More
Image
Published: 01 June 2016
of a copper particle on a copper substrate, the computational parameters are adjusted in such a way that rebounding occurs only when the impact velocity is below 260 m/s (850 ft/s). Note that this value corresponds to the critical velocity of a purely adiabatic case, as in the impact test with 20 mm bullets More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.tt2.t51060251
EISBN: 978-1-62708-355-3
.... The state behind the P wave in Fig. 6 lies on the Hugoniot (see Ref 9 for a discussion of Hugoniots). If the flyer and target plates are composed of the same material, the particle velocity behind the P wave is one half the impact velocity. Reference 10 discusses determination of particle velocity...