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oxygen pitting

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Image
Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.92 Schematic showing mechanism of oxygen pitting More
Image
Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.91 Oxygen pits (a) photograph; (b) 6× More
Image
Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 8 Plot of pitting temperature versus oxygen content of backing gas for Fe-22Cr-5.5Ni-3Mo-0.15N and Fe-23Cr-4Ni-0.1N duplex stainless steels tested in 3% NaCl and 0.1% NaCl solutions, respectively, both at anodic potential of +300 mV. Source: Ref 13 More
Image
Published: 01 June 2007
Fig. 9.8 Pitting potential versus (a) oxygen and (b) carbon content for 316L More
Image
Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 21 Plot of pitting temperature vs. oxygen content of backing gas for Fe-22Cr-5.5Ni-3Mo-0.15N and Fe-23Cr-4Ni-0.1N duplex stainless steels tested in 3% NaCI and 0.1 % NaCI solutions, respectively, both at an anodic potential of+300 mV. Source: Ref 34 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fibtca.t52430204
EISBN: 978-1-62708-253-2
..., including general corrosion, under-deposit corrosion, microbially induced corrosion, flow-accelerated corrosion, stress-assisted corrosion, erosion-corrosion, cavitation, oxygen pitting, stress-corrosion cracking, and caustic embrittlement. The discussion is supported by several illustrations and relevant...
Image
Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 12 Schematic of pit initiation and tubercle formation due to an oxygen concentration cell under a biological deposit. Source: Ref 21 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fibtca.t52430147
EISBN: 978-1-62708-253-2
... corrosion or phosphate hide out Microbially induced corrosion Flow-assisted corrosion (FAC) Erosion corrosion Cavitation damage Oxygen attack or oxygen pitting Stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) Caustic stress-corrosion cracking or caustic embrittlement Stress-assisted corrosion (SAC...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fibtca.t52430343
EISBN: 978-1-62708-253-2
..., the presence of dissolved oxygen in BFW beyond a maximum permissible limit is the cause of tube failure due to oxygen pitting in the form of a localized attack. The buildup of material in the form of deposits because of the ingress of contaminants in feedwater over a period of time results in poor heat...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fibtca.t52430351
EISBN: 978-1-62708-253-2
... the puncture location consisted of fine grains of ferrite and pearlite along with shallow pits formed on the ID surface as a result of oxygen pitting ( Fig. 6.170a ). The microstructure at the weld location consisted of acicular ferrite and fine carbides, as shown in Fig. 6.170(b) . The microstructure also...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ssde.t52310027
EISBN: 978-1-62708-286-0
... is incomplete (e.g., surface defects or scratches) or has broken down as a result of, for example, Cl − (see section on pitting), repassivation does not readily occur since oxygen transport is too slow. These regions become anodes where the following reaction occurs: (Eq 4) 2 Fe( s ) → 2Fe 2...
Image
Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 2 Autocatalytic process occurring in a corrosion pit. The metal, M, is being pitted by an aerated NaCl solution. Rapid dissolution occurs in the pit, while oxygen reduction takes place on the adjacent metal surfaces. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 3 Autocatalytic processes occurring in a corrosion pit. The metal, M, is being pitted by an aerated sodium chloride (NaCl) solution. Rapid dissolution occurs within the pit, while oxygen reduction takes place on the adjacent surfaces. A more detailed explanation of this self-sustaining More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fibtca.t52430379
EISBN: 978-1-62708-253-2
... of leakage and cracking of tube bends and joints in highly stressed areas. 7.2.7 Dissolved Oxygen Oxygen promotes corrosion of both iron and copper. Dissolved oxygen is a major cause of corrosion in steam power plants. Dissolved oxygen, if it exceeds 7 ppb, leads to pitting corrosion of the tubes...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.emea.t52240323
EISBN: 978-1-62708-251-8
... of the metal, or they may have a completely irregular shape. Pitting normally occurs in a stagnant environment. Concentration cells can accelerate pitting. Concentration cells are areas on the metal surface where the oxygen or conductive salt concentrations in water differ. As a pit becomes deeper...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.caaa.t67870045
EISBN: 978-1-62708-299-0
... and stop corroding, as long as oxygen and the corrosive electrolyte still can migrate to the bottom. Pit Morphology While the shape of pits in aluminum can vary from shallow, saucer-like depressions to cylindrical holes, the mouth is usually more or less round, and the pit cavity is roughly...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fec.9781627083027
EISBN: 978-1-62708-302-7
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cpi2.t55030033
EISBN: 978-1-62708-282-2
... that typically inhibits corrosion by reducing to form Cr III film. Most oxidizing agents enhance the likelihood of pitting corrosion by providing extra cathodic reactants and increasing the local potential. Of course, dissolved oxygen is the most common oxidizing agent. One of the reactions by which oxygen...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fec.t65940271
EISBN: 978-1-62708-302-7
... of the passive film, particularly the presence of chloride ions in contact with stainless steels and other alloys. The result is usually pitting corrosion. The rupture of passive films may be due to the loss of oxidizing species in solution (e.g., dissolved oxygen, Fe 3+ ions, NO 2 − ions, etc...
Image
Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 7.33 (a) Schematic polarization curve for iron showing passivity (curve A), active corrosion (curve B), and for oxygen reduction (curve C). (b) Effective polarization curve (curve E) when pitting has activated 1% of the surface (Details can be found in text.) More