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oxide layers

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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.46 Schematics showing formation of oxide layers on steel surface at (a) temperature <570 °C (1060 °F) and (b) temperature >570 °C More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 32 Oxidation of metal through oxide layer. Source: Ref 21 More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 18.25 Oxidation of metal through an oxide layer. Source: Ref 11 More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 23 a) C-AFM data on a FET gate oxide layer that has been chemically exposed. b) Topographic image of the same area showing a defect that appeared as a 5 Å tall ridge coincident with the leakage spot. More
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Published: 01 October 2005
Fig. CH34.3 Mud cracking on the oxide layer of fracture surface More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 1.17 Microhardness traverses through the internally oxidized layer of a carburized Cr-Mn-Ti steel (30KhGT). Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 25 Oxide layer along a seam most likely present in the raw material. Original magnification: 50×. Inset original magnification: 200× More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 19 No oxide layer observed in the hard-phase particles after implementation of corrective measures More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 28 Thick oxide layer indicative of FeO formation that was obtained at a steam treatment temperature of 560 °C More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 29 Oxide layer of 6 μm, indicative of Fe 3 O 4 obtained on reduction of the steam treatment temperature to 530 °C More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 29.12 Oxide layer on alloy 601 exposed to 1150 °C (2100 °F) for 500 h. Original magnification: 75×. Source: Ref 6 More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 5.31 Oxide layer formation in CP tests with varying exposure times. AISI type 316 stainless steel at 816 °C (1500 °F), Δε in = 2%. (a) High creep-rate test. (b) Low creep-rate test. Source: Ref 5.23 More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 5.32 Oxide layer formation in CP tests with varying exposure times. AISI type stainless steel 316 at 705 °C (1300 °F), Δε in = 2%. (a) High creep-rate test. (b) Low creep-rate test. Source: Ref 5.23 More
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Published: 01 March 2000
Fig. 1 Billets with initial oxide layer sitting inside the container having a leftover oxide layer More
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Published: 01 March 2000
Fig. 3 Cleaning of oxide layer using a clean-out block More
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Published: 30 June 2023
Fig. 9.17 Breakdown of the surface oxide layer More
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Published: 30 June 2023
Fig. 10.16 Anodizing. (a) Growth of aluminum oxide surface layer due to anodizing process. (b) SEM photomicrograph of anodized surface layer on 6061-T6 aluminum sheet. Source: Alcoa More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 7.22 Micrographs showing the polished edge of a steel screw mounted in thermosetting epoxy (a) and thermosetting phenolic resin (Bakelite) (b). Note the excellent edge retention of the epoxy mount where a thin oxide layer can be seen on the screw surface. The edge of the screw More
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Published: 01 September 2005
a heavy subsurface layer of oxide scale. Original magnification at 500×. The white band immediately above the decarburized and oxidized layers is electrodeposited nickel that was applied to prevent edge-rounding during polishing. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 79 Illustration showing an AFM tip on n-type silicon. A positive bias on the tip (left) causes accumulation of elections in the silicon at the silicon/oxide interface. The capacitance value is the value of the grown oxide layer. A negative bias on the probe tip (right) causes depletion More