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overheating

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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.55 High carbon steel quenched after overheating in the austenitic single phase field. Very coarse martensite. Etchant: nital. More
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Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 8.15 Localized overheating of sharp corners, keyways, and holes most prevalent in high-frequency induction heating. From F. W. Curtis, High Frequency Induction Heating , McGraw-Hill, New York, 1950 ( Ref 1 ) More
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Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 8.17 Localized overheating of slots in certain parts that results from the tendency for induced currents to follow the part contour. From F. W. Curtis, High Frequency Induction Heating , McGraw-Hill, New York, 1950 ( Ref 1 ) More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 8.13 (Part 1) Overheating of a plain carbon (0.5% C) hypoeutectoid steel. 0.50C-0.06Si-0.7Mn (wt%). This is a continuation of the series in Fig. 8.8 . (a) Austenitized for 1 h at 1350 °C, cooled at 300 °C/h. Picral. 500×. (b) Austenitized for 1 h at 1400 °C, cooled at 300 °C/h More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 8.13 (Part 2) Overheating of a plain carbon (0.5% C) hypoeutectoid steel. 0.50C-0.06Si-0.7Mn (wt%). This is a continuation of the series in Fig. 8.8 . (a) Austenitized for 1 h at 1350 °C, cooled at 300 °C/h. Picral. 500×. (b) Austenitized for 1 h at 1400 °C, cooled at 300 °C/h More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 8.14 (Part 1) Overheating: grain-boundary sulfide precipitation. 0.3% C, Ni-Cr-Mo alloy (0.32C-0.25Si-0.005S-0.006P-2.56Ni-0.84Cr-0.57Mo, wt%). Heated for 1 h at 1400 °C, cooled at 750 °C/h, austenitized at 850 °C, quenched in oil, tempered at 600 °C. 350 HV. (a) Scanning electron More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 8.14 (Part 2) Overheating: grain-boundary sulfide precipitation. 0.3% C, Ni-Cr-Mo alloy (0.32C-0.25Si-0.005S-0.006P-2.56Ni-0.84Cr-0.57Mo, wt%). Heated for 1 h at 1400 °C, cooled at 750 °C/h, austenitized at 850 °C, quenched in oil, tempered at 600 °C. 350 HV. (a) Scanning electron More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 8.15 Overheating: grain-boundary sulfide precipitation. 0.4% C, Ni-Cr-Mo alloy (0.40C-0.03Si-0.02P-1.8Ni-0.3Mo, wt%). (a) Heated for 1 h at 1325 °C, cooled at 750 °C/h, heated at 850 °C, oil quenched, tempered. Light macrograph of fracture surface. 5×. (b) Heated for 1 h at 1325 °C More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 8.16 (Part 1) Overheating: grain-boundary liquation. 0.3% C, Ni-Cr-Mo alloy (0.32C-0.20Si-0.62Mn-0.009S-0.009P-2.56Ni-0.87Cr-0.57Mo, wt%). Heated for 1 h at 1450 °C, cooled at 750 °C/h, austenitized at 850 °C, oil quenched, tempered at 600 °C. 350 HV. (a) to (d) All from the same More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 8.17 (Part 1) Overheating: grain-boundary liquation. (a) to (c) 0.4% C, Cr-Mo alloy (0.40C-0.02Si-1.11Cr-0.2Mo-0.03S, wt%). Commercial forging, quenched and tempered. (a) Picral. 100×. (b) Nitric-sulfuric. 100×. (c) Electrolytic ammonium nitrate. 100×. (d) 1.4% C alloy, (1.40C More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.1 (a) Thick-lip rupture in a boiler tube due to long-term overheating. (b) Thin-lip rupture in a boiler due to short-term overheating More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.2 Carbon steel boiler tube sample subjected to prolonged overheating below Ac 1 showing voids (black) along the grain boundaries and spheroidization of carbides, (a) optical micrograph, 200×; and (b) SEM image, 3500× More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 7 Thin-lip rupture in a boiler tube caused by rapid overheating. This rupture exhibits a “cobra” appearance as a result of lateral bending under the reaction force imposed by escaping steam. The tube was a 2-½ in. outside diameter, 0.250 in. wall boiler tube made of 1.25Cr-0.5Mo steel More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 14 Creep damage (bowing) of a cobalt-base alloy turbine vane from overheating. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 9.15 Grain-boundary oxidation and melting due to overheating during forging. Unetched. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 11.5 Cross-hole overheating: eddy-current distribution and heat nonuniformities due to presence of transverse holes. (a) Transverse hole, no plug. (b) Carbon steel part and carbon steel plug. (c) Carbon steel part and copper plug. (d) Multiholed part, no plugs. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 11.6 Longitudinal holes overheating: (a) eddy-current redistribution due to presence of longitudinal hole; (b) overheating areas due to presence of longitudinal holes. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 16.14 Creep damage (bowing) of a cobalt-base alloy turbine vane from overheating More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 17-8 Structures illustrating overheating in an M2 broach. Top: Proper microstructure found at one end of broach. Bottom: Overheated structure found at the other end of broach. Very uneven furnace heating was responsible for the quite different microstructures. Light micrographs. 400× More
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Published: 30 April 2024
Fig. 11.10 Example of overheating and burning of forgings (a) black oxide from overheating of copper forging heated to 1023 °C (1875 °F) (b) Burning (black outlines) at grain boundaries of copper forging heated to 1065 °C (1950 °F) More