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optical microscopes

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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 3 Optical microscope image of a 55nm device after mechanical polish. The deprocessing technique was not adequate resulting in very poor planarity across the die. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 4 Optical microscope image of a 55nm device deprocessed to the Metal1 layer. The deprocessing recipe was optimized to achieve good planarity across the entire die (See references ). More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 3 An optical microscope image from a unit after the backside silicon etch process was completed. Silicon is removed from regions where the unit appears dark. The few remaining small bright spots are locations where silicon remains. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 7 Optical microscope images taken from a unit both before (left) and after (right) the dimpling process was performed. The contrast observed in these images is used to determine the endpoint for the dimpling process. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 10 A) and B) Optical microscope images of good and failed device, respectively; C) and D) SEM image failed device showing short between two pins causing electrical failure. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 4 Static fault isolation setup on a wafer-level scanning optical microscope. More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 1.1 Optical microscope image of the surface of a polished and etched iron bar showing grains and grain boundaries. Original magnification: 100×. Source: Ref 1.1 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.1 Appearance of various types of steel grains in an optical microscope. Cm, cementite More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. D.5 Structure is delta phase (Ni3Nb) in a gamma matrix. Optical microscope, original magnification 1000×. Condition: Solution treated and aged—solution annealed 1 h at 955 °C (1750 °F), air cooled, aged 8 h at 720 °C (1325 °F), and furnace cooled in 10 h to 620 °C (1150 °F). Source More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 9.9 Optical microscopic images of the vertical and the cross section of the unidirectional eutectic solidification structure. (a) Phase diagrams. (b) Lamellar eutectic structure. (c) Rodlike eutectic structure. Courtesy of Y. Kawahara More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mfadr7.t91110042
EISBN: 978-1-62708-247-1
... Abstract Moore's Law has driven many degree circuit features below the resolving capability of optical microscopy. Yet the optical microscope remains a valuable tool in failure analysis. This article describes the physics governing resolution and useful techniques for extracting the small...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sap.t53000139
EISBN: 978-1-62708-313-3
... , 1972 , p 157 – 192 Fig. D.1 Laves phase (white islands) has precipitated at dendrites in the gamma matrix. Optical microscope, original magnification 250x. Condition: Solution treated and aged—solution annealed 1 h at 1095 °C (2000 °F), air cooled, reannealed 1 h at 980 °C (1800 °F), air...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.smnm.t52140021
EISBN: 978-1-62708-264-8
... the various phases. The chapter concludes with a brief review of spheroidized microstructures. electron microscopes grain structure heat treatment microstructure optical microscopes steel THE OPTICAL MICROSCOPE is the principal tool used to characterize the internal grain structure of steels...
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 5.1 Schematic illustration of lighting methods in metallographic optical microscopes: (a) oblique or inclined illumination; (b) normal illumination or illumination parallel to the optical axis—the most common method; (c) dark field illumination. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 5.13 Stains caused by water retained between the metallic matrix and the graphite in an oxidized cast iron. Sometimes it can take a few seconds or minutes for water to leave cavities. Inverted optical microscopes help accelerate the water exudation. This contributes to damaging More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 8.1 Experiment on the spontaneous nucleation by the droplet method. (a) Principle of droplet method. (b) Observation with an optical microscope. (c) Observation of volume change. Source: Ref 1 – 3 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. D.11 The lamellar constituent is a boride (M3B2) formed by incipient fusion. The two large crystals are metal carbide. Optical microscope, original magnification 1500×. Condition: As fabricated (as forged) Source: Ref 1 , 2 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 13.10 Detail from Fig. 13.9 . Ferrite (light) and martensite. The martensite areas are easier to observe. In this case, in the optical microscope retained austenite cannot be identified. Etchant: nital 3%. Courtesy of C. S. Viana, EEIMVR-UFF, Volta Redonda, RJ, Brazil. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 16.21 Axial cracks in a failed boiler tube from a nuclear power plant. The cracks were detected by nondestructive eddy current inspection. (a) and (b) show the same fracture surface as (a) a SEM backscatter electron image and (b) an optical microscope image. Courtesy of Marcus Brown, NDE More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. D.10 Nickel-rich solid-solution matrix, eutectic with M3B2 formed by fusion at 1205 °C (2200 °F), large crystals of metal carbide, and M23C6 carbide at grain and twin boundaries. Optical microscope, original magnification 500×. Condition: As fabricated (as forged) Source: Ref 1 , 2 More