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oil quenching

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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 18 AISI O1 tool steel that cracked during oil quenching. Note the cracks emanating from the sharp corners. The four holes, which are close to the edge, also contribute to cracking. Source: Ref 16 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 19 Fixture made from AISI O1 tool that cracked during oil quenching. The design is poor for liquid quenching. Source: Ref 16 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 5 Case hardenabilities of a number of carburizing steels with oil quenching More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 2-124 Oil-quenching half drum fixtures. Weight of castings 579 and 840 lb (263 and 381 kg) More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 6.21 Case hardenabilities of a number of carburizing steels with oil quenching. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 5 Tempering curves for carburized and oil-quenched and carbonitrided and oil-quenched steels. Source: J.L. Dossett, Midland Metal Treating Inc., Personal research, 1992 Temperature Hardness, HRC °C °F 8620 carburized steel 8620 carbonitrided steel 1018 carbonitrided steel More
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Published: 30 April 2024
Fig. 7.13 Tempering curves for carburized and oil-quenched and carbonitrided and oil-quenched steels. Source: J.L. Dossett, Midland Metal Treating Inc., personal research, 1992 More
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Published: 30 April 2024
Fig. 11.2 Quench cracks formed in oil-quenched tool steel die. Cracks originated from the sharp corners of the keyway and from holes that were located too close to the surface. More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 16.8 Hardness distribution in oil-quenched bars of SAE 1045 steel. The various bar diameters are indicated. Source: Ref 16.16 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 16.9 Hardness distributions in oil-quenched bars of SAE 6140 steel. The various bar diameters are indicated. Source: Ref 16.16 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 16.12 Schematic representation of extent of hardening in oil-quenched and water-quenched bars of SAE 3140 steel of various diameters. The cross-hatched areas represent the unhardened core. Source: Ref 16.16 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 16.16 Hardness at the center of water- and oil-quenched bars of SAE 3140 steel of various diameters. Source: Ref 16.16 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 17.4 Change in mechanical properties with tempering temperature for oil-quenched 4340 steel. Source: Ref 17.3 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 19.13 Intergranular fracture surface of CVN-tested 4340 steel oil quenched and tempered at 350 °C (660 °F). SEM micrograph. Courtesy of J. Materkowski. Source: Ref 19.41 More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 9.19 Martensite formation (oil quench) in transformation of 0.6% C hypoeutectoid steels. 0.61 C-0.08Si-0.60Mn (wt%). 2 mm thick specimen. Austenitized at 860 °C, oil quenched. 835 HV. Arrows in (b) and (d) indicate typical examples of plate martensite. (a) Picral. 250×. (b) Picral More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 12.11 Cooling curve measured in the ISO 9950 test using an oil quench bath More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 10 Three-chamber cold-wall vacuum oil-quench furnace. Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 12 A batch-graphite integral oil-quench vacuum furnace with vacuum-carburizing capability. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 13 Centerline cooling curves for oil-quenched steel bars of varying section sizes, assuming a surface heat-transfer coefficient of 0.019 cal s –1 °C –1 cm 2 More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 12 AMS 6470 steel with 0.15 to 0.35% Pb added, oil quenched from 900 °C (1650 °F), tempered 2 h at 605 °C (1125 °F), surface activated in manganese phosphate, and gas nitrided 30 h at 525 °C (975 °F). Structure is a white layer of Fe 2 N and a matrix of tempered martensite. 2% nital. 400× More