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nitrides

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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.6 Acicular nitrides (believed to be chromium nitrides) in a Widmanstätten pattern formed in the vicinity of creep cracks in Type 302SS after creep-rupture testing at 870 °C (1600 °F) in less than 1000 h. Original magnification, 500×. Source: Ref 30 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.7 Acicular aluminum nitrides and blocky chromium nitrides, which formed in the vicinity of the creep cracks in alloy 800HT pigtail in a hydrogen reformer, were not dissolved into solution after the sample was resolution annealed at 1150 °C (2100 °F) for 1 h. Source: Ref 34 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.11 Some blocky chromium nitrides and extensive acicular aluminum nitrides formed in alloy 617 after testing in the dynamic burner rig at 980 °C (1800 °F) for 1000 h with 30 min thermal cycling. The combustion gas stream with about mach 0.3 (100 meter/s) consisted of 76% N 2 , 13% O 2 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.13 Extensive internal nitrides (believed to be titanium nitrides) formed in alloy 263 after testing in the dynamic burner rig at 980 °C (1800 °F) for 1000 h with 30 min thermal cycling. The combustion gas stream with about mach 0.3 (100 m/s) consisted of 76% N 2 , 13% O 2 , 6% CO 2 More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 5 Isothermal precipitation kinetics for carbides, nitrides, σ/χ, and α′ phases in ferritic alloys containing 26% Cr, 1–4% Mo, and 0–4% Ni. Source: Ref 49 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.2 Standard free energy of formation for selected nitrides. Source: Ref 10 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.5 Formation of internal aluminum nitrides beneath external oxide scales and internal oxides in alloy 601 after exposing to a furnace oxidizing atmosphere for approximately 4 to 5 years in a temperature range of 760 to 870 °C (1400 to 1600 °F). (a) Optical micrograph showing the external More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.8 Extensive aluminum and chromium nitrides formed in the vicinity of creep cracks in the bend section of an alloy 800H pigtail in another hydrogen reformer. Source: Ref 34 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.12 Extensive internal chromium nitrides formed in alloy X after testing in the dynamic burner rig at 980 °C (1800 °F) for 1000 h with 30 min thermal cycling. The combustion gas stream with about mach 0.3 (100 m/s) consisted of 76% N 2 , 13% O 2 , 6% CO 2 , and 5% H 2 O. Source: Ref 36 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.16 Extensive internal blocky chromium nitrides formed in alloy 556 (a), Type 310 (b), and alloy 800H (c) after the dynamic burner rig testing at 980 °C (1800 °F) for 1000 h with 30 min cycles. Courtesy of Haynes International, Inc. More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.18 Extensive blocky chromium nitrides formed in Type 310SS after testing in the dynamic burner rig testing at 870 °C (1600 °F) for 2000 h with 30 min cycles. Courtesy of Haynes International, Inc. More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.32 Optical micrograph showing extensive internal chromium nitrides that formed in the entire cross section of a wire sample obtained from a Type 314 wire mesh belt in a sintering furnace after service for 2 to 3 months at 1120 °C (2050 °F) in N 2 -10% H 2 . Courtesy of Haynes More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 3 Schematic showing the nucleation of γ′- and ε-nitrides on iron. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 June 2007
Fig. 5.49 Effect of cooling rate on the presence of chromium nitrides in the microstructure of 316L parts sintered at 1250 °C (2282 °F) in dissociated ammonia. Source: Ref 63 . Reprinted with permission from MPIF, Metal Powder Industries Federation, Princeton, NJ More
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Published: 01 December 1996
Fig. 8-24 Solubility product for various carbides and nitrides in austenite. (From B. Aronsson, in Steel Strengthening Mechanisms , p 77, Climax Molybdenum Co., Greenwich, CT (1969)) More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.htcma.t52080067
EISBN: 978-1-62708-304-1
... Abstract Oxidation usually dominates high-temperature corrosion reactions, but under certain conditions, some alloys may be affected by nitridation as well. This chapter explains why nitridation occurs and how it attacks various metals, in some cases, penetrating deeper than oxidation...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.gmpm.t51250227
EISBN: 978-1-62708-345-4
... Abstract Nitriding is a surface hardening heat treatment that introduces nitrogen into the surface of steel while it is in the ferritic condition. Gas nitriding using ammonia as the nitrogen-carrying species is the most commonly employed process and is emphasized in this chapter. Nitriding...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pnfn.t65900001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-350-8
... Abstract This chapter discusses the metallurgical considerations and process requirements of nitriding. It presents the pioneering work of Adolph Machlet and Adolph Fry and presents early developments. One such development is the Floe process, a two-stage treatment used to reduce the formation...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pnfn.t65900013
EISBN: 978-1-62708-350-8
... Abstract The unique advantages of the nitriding process were recognized by German researchers in the early 1920s. It was used to treat steels for applications that required: high torque, high wear resistance; abrasive wear resistance; corrosion resistance; and high surface compressive strength...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pnfn.t65900071
EISBN: 978-1-62708-350-8
... Abstract This chapter begins with an overview of the history of ion nitriding. This is followed by sections that describe how the ion nitriding process works, glow discharge characteristics, process parameters requiring good control, and the applications of plasma processing. The chapter...