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niobium alloys

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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 31.4 Niobium alloy C-103 annealed sheet. Arc melted, hot extruded, warm rolled, and annealed. Cold rolled to finished size. Final annealed in vacuum at 1290 °C (2350 °F) for 1 h. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 10 Corrosion of niobium-stabilized 29% Cr plus 4% Mo alloys in ASTM A 763 Y test. Source: Ref 11 More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 22-7 Comparison of standard HP grade, niobium-modified alloys, and micro-alloyed compositions—100,000 hour rupture lives More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170308
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... Abstract This article discusses the role of alloying in the production and use of common refractory metals, including molybdenum, tungsten, niobium, tantalum, and rhenium. It provides an overview of each metal and its alloys, describing the compositions, properties, and processing...
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Published: 01 November 2013
, copper alloys, magnesium alloys, beryllium, stainless steels, nickel alloys, titanium and titanium alloys, iron and nickel and cobalt superalloys, niobium and niobium alloys, tantalum and tantalum alloys, molybdenum and molybdenum alloys, tungsten alloys Process variations Closed-die forging More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.emea.t52240583
EISBN: 978-1-62708-251-8
..., primarily for niobium alloys in aerospace applications, to enable their use in high-temperature oxidizing environments. Comparative properties of refractory metals Table 31.1 Comparative properties of refractory metals Metal Crystal structure (a) Specific gravity Melting point Modulus...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930353
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
... Abstract This article discusses the weldability and fusion weld properties of refractory metal alloys. The alloys discussed include tantalum, niobium, rhenium, molybdenum, and tungsten. molybdenum niobium rhenium tantalum tungsten weldability THE REFRACTORY METALS, which include...
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 8 Effect of binary alloy additions on the transition temperature of niobium. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 9 Effect of binary alloy additions on the yield strength of niobium at 1095 °C (2000 °F). Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 10 Creep strengthening effect of alloying elements in niobium at 1200 °C (2190 °F). Source: Ref 5 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930071
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
... of the alloying elements niobium, silicon, and carbon on the temperature range of two-phase coexistence of liquid and solid (equilibrium melting/solidification temperature range) and on solidification cracking susceptibility. Solidification cracking susceptibility was measured with the varestraint test, using...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170290
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... Aluminum 0–6 0–4.5 Titanium 0–6 0–4 Cobalt 0–20 … Nickel … 0–22 Niobium 0–5 0–4 Tantalum 0–12 0–9 Rhenium 0–6 0–2 Role of alloying elements in superalloys Table 1(b) Role of alloying elements in superalloys Effect (a) Iron-base Cobalt-base Nickel-base...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cpi2.t55030148
EISBN: 978-1-62708-282-2
..., copper, titanium, zirconium, vanadium, niobium, and tantalum alloys. hydrogen damage iron-base alloys nickel alloys aluminum alloys copper alloys titanium alloys zirconium alloys vanadium alloys niobium alloys tantalum alloys HYDROGEN DAMAGE is a form of environmentally assisted...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170193
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... or grades of HSLA steel along with information on available mill forms, key characteristics, and intended uses. The article explains how small amounts of alloying elements, particularly vanadium, niobium, and titanium, control not only the properties of HSLA steels, but also their manufacturability...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.hss.t52790235
EISBN: 978-1-62708-356-0
... (alloy steel) K93600 Invar (36% nickel alloy steel) L13700 Alloy Sn 70 (tin-lead solder) N06007 Nickel-chromium alloy (Hastelloy G) N06625 Alloy 625 (nickel-chromium-molybdenum-niobium alloy) R58210 Alloy 21 (titanium alloy) S30452 AISI 304N (stainless steel, high nitrogen...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fahtsc.t51130541
EISBN: 978-1-62708-284-6
... Cerium (Ce) 6.2–6.7 3.4–3.7 Pure Rhenium (Re) 6.5 3.6 Pure Tantalum (Ta) 4.9–8.2 2.7–4.6 Pure Chromium (Cr) 6.8 3.8 Pure Iridium (Ir) 2.0–12 1.1–6.7 Magnetically soft iron alloys 7.1 3.9 Pure Technetium (Tc) 7.2–7.3 4.0–4.1 Pure Niobium (Nb) 5.1–9.6 2.8–5.3 Pure...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cub.t66910237
EISBN: 978-1-62708-250-1
... selection, and discuss, where appropriate, the characteristic forms of corrosion that attack specific materials. The materials addressed in this chapter include carbon steels, weathering steels, and alloy steels; nickel, copper, aluminum, titanium, lead, magnesium, tin, zirconium, tantalum, niobium...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ssde.t52310109
EISBN: 978-1-62708-286-0
... plus nitrogen to levels below 0.02% and the use of dual stabilization by titanium and niobium; 468 (UNS S40930) is such an alloy. The historical archetype of ferritic stainless steels was 430, which has existed since the 1920s and is still widely used. Its drawbacks are lack of weldability...
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 22-1 The effects of strengthening additions of niobium and niobium plus titanium on the rupture stresses of HK40 base alloy at 982 °C (1800 °F) More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sccmpe2.t55090317
EISBN: 978-1-62708-266-2
... elements from groups 4A through 6A, particularly titanium, niobium, molybdenum, and zirconium. These alloying elements must be dissolved in solid solution for maximum benefit to corrosion resistance and/or strength. All of these elements are extremely soluble in the high-temperature γ phase (T > 771 °C...