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niobium

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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 20.34 Rod-reinforced niobium carbide/niobium eutectic. Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 22-1 The effects of strengthening additions of niobium and niobium plus titanium on the rupture stresses of HK40 base alloy at 982 °C (1800 °F) More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 2 Effect of niobium carbide on yield strength for various sizes of niobium carbide particles More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 2.17 The titanium-molybdenum system. Molybdenum, niobium, tantalum, vanadium, hafnium, and zirconium form a complete series of beta solid solutions with titanium; hafnium and zirconium also form a complete series of alpha solid solutions. More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 3.10 The titanium-niobium phase diagram. This beta-stabilized system is typical of the beta-isomorphous type. Both titanium and niobium have a body-centered cubic crystal structure. More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 8.10 One-hour grain growth is suppressed by adding very small amounts of niobium to a 1040 steel. Source: Ref 8.6 More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 4.19 Transverse billet section of IN-718 nickel-base superalloy showing niobium distribution in homogenized and forged product (a) heat treated to maximize delta precipitation and macroetched, showing lack of contrast in section, and (b) same section heat treated to exceed the local More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 4.26 Niobium distribution in a transverse trace of IN-718 homogenized and forged to 10 in. (25 cm) billet More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 5.8 (Part 1) Niobium-containing high-strength 0.2C-1.5%Mn-0.05%Nb plate. (a) 0.21C-0.09Si-1.48Mn-0.04Nb (wt%). As-rolled 5 mm plate; finish rolled at a comparatively low temperature. 180 HV. Picral. 100×. (b) 0.21C-0.09Si-1.48Mn-0.04Nb (wt%). As-rolled 5 mm plate; finish rolled More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 5.9 (Part 1) Niobium-containing high-strength 0.15%C-1.4%Mn-0.05Nb rolled plate 12 mm thick (0.16C-0.04Si-1.43Mn-0.04Nb, wt%). Material is shown in the as-rolled condition in Fig. 5.8 (Part 2) (e) and (f) . (a) Austenitized at 900 °C; cooled in air. 165 HV. Picral. 100×. (b More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 22-7 Comparison of standard HP grade, niobium-modified alloys, and micro-alloyed compositions—100,000 hour rupture lives More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 13.11 Electron micrograph of a thin film of niobium. Position of flux lines is indicated by decoration with iron particles. The underlying dislocation structure can be seen to have interfered with the flux line lattice [from C. P. Herring ( Dew-Hughes, 1974 )]. More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 15.17 Binary phase diagram of beryllium-niobium. Source: Okamoto and Tanner 1987a More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 31.4 Niobium alloy C-103 annealed sheet. Arc melted, hot extruded, warm rolled, and annealed. Cold rolled to finished size. Final annealed in vacuum at 1290 °C (2350 °F) for 1 h. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 8 Effect of binary alloy additions on the transition temperature of niobium. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 9 Effect of binary alloy additions on the yield strength of niobium at 1095 °C (2000 °F). Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 10 Creep strengthening effect of alloying elements in niobium at 1200 °C (2190 °F). Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 10 Corrosion of niobium-stabilized 29% Cr plus 4% Mo alloys in ASTM A 763 Y test. Source: Ref 11 More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 12 Influence of vanadium and niobium on high-temperature properties More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170193
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... or grades of HSLA steel along with information on available mill forms, key characteristics, and intended uses. The article explains how small amounts of alloying elements, particularly vanadium, niobium, and titanium, control not only the properties of HSLA steels, but also their manufacturability...