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nickel-molybdenum alloys

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Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 5.29 Anodic polarization curves for nickel-molybdenum alloys in 1 N H 2 SO 4 . Redrawn from Ref 26 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cw.t51820125
EISBN: 978-1-62708-339-3
... in this chapter is on the CRAs and in particular nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys. The chapter provides a basic understanding of general welding considerations and describes the welding metallurgy of molybdenum-containing CRAs and of nickel-copper, nickel-chromium, and nickel-chromium-iron CRAs. It discusses...
Image
Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 5.19 Recommended region of chromium and molybdenum content of nickel-base alloy with approximately 55 to 60 wt% Ni in H 2 S-CO 2 -Cl − -S environment. Line 1: SCC; 230 °C (450 °F), l MPa H 2 S + 1 MPa CO 2 + 25 wt% NaCl + 1 g/L S 8 , 336 h; four-point bent beam. Line 2: hydrogen More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cpi2.t55030074
EISBN: 978-1-62708-282-2
... Commercially pure nickel N02200 Ni-200 99.6 … … … 0.2 … 0.2 Mn Nickel-copper alloy N04400 Monel 400 67 … 31.5 … 1.2 … … Nickel-molybdenum alloys N10665 Hastelloy B-2 72 … … 28 … … … N10675 Hastelloy B-3 68.5 1.5 … 28.5 1.5...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170495
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... corrosion and oxidation resistance. The degree of solution hardening has been related to the atomic size difference between nickel and the alloying element, and therefore the ability of the solute to interfere with dislocation motion. Tungsten, molybdenum, niobium, tantalum, and aluminum, when aluminum...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fahtsc.t51130541
EISBN: 978-1-62708-284-6
... Osmium (Os) 4.5–4.6 2.5–2.6 Pure Tungsten (W) 0.6–8.7 0.3–4.8 Iron-cobalt-nickel alloys 4.8–5.1 2.7–2.8 Pure Molybdenum (Mo) 5.6 3.1 Pure Arsenic (As) 6.0 3.3 Pure Germanium (Ge) 6.1 3.4 Pure Hafnium (Hf) 5.7–7.0 3.2–3.9 Pure Zirconium (Zr) 6.3–6.6 3.5–3.7 Pure...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.emea.t52240547
EISBN: 978-1-62708-251-8
... nickel alloys. Corrosion- and heat-resistant nickel alloys include commercially pure and low-alloy nickels, nickel-copper alloys, nickel-molybdenum and nickel-silicon alloys, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys, and nickel-chromium-iron-molybdenum-copper alloys. Special nickel...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cpi2.t55030176
EISBN: 978-1-62708-282-2
... the austenitic and duplex grades further with chromium, molybdenum, and nitrogen, and the ferritic grades with chromium and molybdenum. The beneficial effects of these alloying elements are complex and interactive. Attempts have been made by suppliers of stainless steels and nickel-base alloys to develop...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cpi2.t55030112
EISBN: 978-1-62708-282-2
... in the HAZ is a potential problem in both classes of alloys. However, in the case of nickel-base alloys, the high content of such alloying elements as chromium, molybdenum, tungsten, and niobium can result in the precipitation of other intermetallic phases, such as μ, σ, and η. Therefore, this section...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fahtsc.9781627082846
EISBN: 978-1-62708-284-6
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sch6.t68200295
EISBN: 978-1-62708-354-6
... of the habit of ordering “Hastelloy C” as a generic alloy. Hastelloy C-276 (low carbon with tungsten) replaced “C” but has no cast counterpart in ASTM-A494. CW12MW ordered with a 0.02% maximum carbon is a good equivalent. CW2M and CW6M are nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys with no other alloying elements...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170107
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... between resistance to abrasion and the toughness needed to withstand repeated impact. All high-alloy white irons contain chromium to prevent formation of graphite on solidification and to ensure the stability of the carbide phase. Most also contain nickel, molybdenum, copper, or combinations...
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Published: 01 November 2013
, copper alloys, magnesium alloys, beryllium, stainless steels, nickel alloys, titanium and titanium alloys, iron and nickel and cobalt superalloys, niobium and niobium alloys, tantalum and tantalum alloys, molybdenum and molybdenum alloys, tungsten alloys Process variations Closed-die forging More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170257
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
.... This alloy has been used in many applications in a wide variety of chemical and allied industry environments. The presence of niobium in the alloy minimizes weld sensitization (intergranular corrosion), and the higher nickel content (32.5 to 35%) confers resistance to chloride SCC. The molybdenum content (2...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170540
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... melting point of 1493 °C (2719 °F), cobalt has a face-centered cubic (fcc) structure (α-cobalt). Although the principal alloying elements affect the temperature of this transition (chromium, tungsten, and molybdenum stabilize the hcp phase, and iron and nickel stabilize the fcc structure), the fcc-to-hcp...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sap.t53000059
EISBN: 978-1-62708-313-3
... substitute for both nickel and aluminum in γ′; in this respect, its behavior is similar to that of molybdenum and iron ( Ref 5 ). The coarsening rate of γ′ in Ni-Cr-Ti-Al alloys decreases with increasing chromium content in the 10 to 37 weight percent range because of a reduction in the equilibrium...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pht2.t51440125
EISBN: 978-1-62708-262-4
...% A steel is also classified as an alloy steel when a difinite range or a definite minimum quantity of any of the following elements is specified or required within recognized limits: Aluminum Boron Chromium (up to 3.99%) Cobalt Molybdenum Nickel Niobium Titanium Tungsten...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170234
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... not directly participate in the age-hardening reaction, because this element does not form a precipitate with iron, nickel, molybdenum, or titanium in the 18Ni maraging alloy system. The main contribution of cobalt is to lower the solubility of molybdenum in the martensitic matrix and thus increase the amount...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fec.t65940183
EISBN: 978-1-62708-302-7
... in 1 N H 2 SO 4 . Redrawn from Ref 13 Fig. 5.28 Anodic polarization curves for chromium-nickel alloys in 1 N H 2 SO 4 . Redrawn from Ref 13 Anodic Polarization of Nickel-Molybdenum Alloys Nickel dissolves up to 35 wt% molybdenum forming a face-centered-cubic solid solution...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170062
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... grain-boundary carbides. These elements are controlled by careful selection of metallic raw materials for melting. Alloying Elements to Promote Hardenability Nickel, molybdenum, manganese, and copper all promote hardenability. See the section “ Effects of Alloying on Hardenability ” for details...