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nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cw.t51820125
EISBN: 978-1-62708-339-3
... in this chapter is on the CRAs and in particular nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys. The chapter provides a basic understanding of general welding considerations and describes the welding metallurgy of molybdenum-containing CRAs and of nickel-copper, nickel-chromium, and nickel-chromium-iron CRAs. It discusses...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.emea.t52240547
EISBN: 978-1-62708-251-8
... nickel alloys. Corrosion- and heat-resistant nickel alloys include commercially pure and low-alloy nickels, nickel-copper alloys, nickel-molybdenum and nickel-silicon alloys, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys, and nickel-chromium-iron-molybdenum-copper alloys. Special nickel...
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 2-123 Crankshaft for a mechanical forging press. 6500 lb (2948 kg), nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy More
Image
Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 5.19 Recommended region of chromium and molybdenum content of nickel-base alloy with approximately 55 to 60 wt% Ni in H 2 S-CO 2 -Cl − -S environment. Line 1: SCC; 230 °C (450 °F), l MPa H 2 S + 1 MPa CO 2 + 25 wt% NaCl + 1 g/L S 8 , 336 h; four-point bent beam. Line 2: hydrogen More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sch6.t68200295
EISBN: 978-1-62708-354-6
... of the habit of ordering “Hastelloy C” as a generic alloy. Hastelloy C-276 (low carbon with tungsten) replaced “C” but has no cast counterpart in ASTM-A494. CW12MW ordered with a 0.02% maximum carbon is a good equivalent. CW2M and CW6M are nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys with no other alloying elements...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170495
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... The nickel alloy family consists of: Commercially pure nickels Low-alloy nickels Nickel-copper alloys Nickel-molybdenum alloys Nickel-chromium-iron alloys Iron-nickel-chromium alloys Nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys Nickel-chromium-iron-molybdenum alloys Nickel-chromium-tungsten...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fahtsc.t51130541
EISBN: 978-1-62708-284-6
... silicon-molybdenum cast iron 10–12 5.6–6.5 Iron carbon alloys 9.3–12 5.2–6.9 Pure Terbium (Tb) 9.8–13 5.4–6.9 Cobalt chromium nickel tungsten 10–12 5.8–6.7 High-carbon high-chromium cold work tool steel 11 6.2 Tungsten high-speed tool steel 8.5–14 4.7–7.8 Commercially pure...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cpi2.t55030112
EISBN: 978-1-62708-282-2
... in the HAZ is a potential problem in both classes of alloys. However, in the case of nickel-base alloys, the high content of such alloying elements as chromium, molybdenum, tungsten, and niobium can result in the precipitation of other intermetallic phases, such as μ, σ, and η. Therefore, this section...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cpi2.t55030074
EISBN: 978-1-62708-282-2
... … … Nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys N10276 Hastelloy C-276 59 16 … 16 5 4 … N06455 Hastelloy C-4 68 16 … 16 … … … N06022 Hastelloy C-22 59 22 … 13 3 3 … N06200 Hastelloy C-2000 59 23 1.6 16 … … … N06059 Nicrofer 5923hMo (alloy 59) 59 23 … 16 1...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170107
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... between resistance to abrasion and the toughness needed to withstand repeated impact. All high-alloy white irons contain chromium to prevent formation of graphite on solidification and to ensure the stability of the carbide phase. Most also contain nickel, molybdenum, copper, or combinations...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cpi2.t55030176
EISBN: 978-1-62708-282-2
... the austenitic and duplex grades further with chromium, molybdenum, and nitrogen, and the ferritic grades with chromium and molybdenum. The beneficial effects of these alloying elements are complex and interactive. Attempts have been made by suppliers of stainless steels and nickel-base alloys to develop...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170257
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... resistance, whereas nickel is used to adjust the austenite and ferrite contents to the 50:50 ratio. Since both chromium and molybdenum promote the formation of the embrittling sigma phase, chromium is usually kept in the range 22 to 26% and molybdenum is kept in the range 2 to 5%. Other alloying...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170540
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... melting point of 1493 °C (2719 °F), cobalt has a face-centered cubic (fcc) structure (α-cobalt). Although the principal alloying elements affect the temperature of this transition (chromium, tungsten, and molybdenum stabilize the hcp phase, and iron and nickel stabilize the fcc structure), the fcc-to-hcp...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fahtsc.9781627082846
EISBN: 978-1-62708-284-6
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pht2.t51440125
EISBN: 978-1-62708-262-4
...% A steel is also classified as an alloy steel when a difinite range or a definite minimum quantity of any of the following elements is specified or required within recognized limits: Aluminum Boron Chromium (up to 3.99%) Cobalt Molybdenum Nickel Niobium Titanium Tungsten...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ssde.t52310001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-286-0
... simultaneously. Stainless steel is an exceptional alloy system in that it is not a dilute solution. Alloy steels may contain several percent of alloying elements, such as carbon, manganese, nickel, molybdenum, chromium, and silicon, in addition to the impurities sulfur, oxygen, and phosphorus. Alloy steels...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930329
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
... Alloys These materials have good weldability and are often used in the as-welded condition. The alloys are usually formed by additions to nickel of chromium, cobalt, molybdenum, iron, and sometimes small amounts of aluminum, silicon, and niobium ( Table 2 ). The solid-solution nickel-base...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170242
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... have been adopted as significant improvements. These usually involve variations of carbon and manganese, with or without additional alloys such as chromium, nickel, molybdenum, vanadium, titanium, and bismuth. The most common of these compositions, as listed in ASTM A 128, are given in Table 1...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ssde.t52310069
EISBN: 978-1-62708-286-0
... used when high strength or high formability is the main objective; (2) chromium nickel alloys used for high temperature oxidation resistance; and (3) chromium, molybdenum, nickel, and nitrogen alloys used for applications where corrosion resistance is the main objective. austenitic stainless...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ssde.t52310091
EISBN: 978-1-62708-286-0
..., such as AL-6XN alloy, with PRENs of around 45. Ferritics have a gap between 442 (18Cr-2Mo) and the super ferritics (28Cr-4Mo). By varying the chromium, nickel, and molybdenum, leaner alloys can be devised that save cost based on reduced molybdenum and nickel. Conversely, more corrosion-resistant alloys...