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mottled cast iron

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Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.65 Mottled cast iron. Dark areas are gray cast iron. The rest of the cross section is white cast iron. Etchant: picral. More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.63 Mottled cast iron. Regions with graphite clusters (gray areas) and regions without graphite (white regions). Not etched. More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.66 Mottled cast iron. Dendrites transformed into pearlite. Distribution E graphite. Areas of ledeburite and cementite. Etchant: picral. More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.67 Transverse cross section of an old brake pad, made of mottled cast iron. The edges of the pad, in the upper part of the image, have cooled faster than the rest of the part and have a white cast iron structure. The macrograph also shows the presence of two low-carbon steel bars More
Image
Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 1.27 Micrograph of a mottled cast iron showing a microstructure consisting of pearlite (dark gray etching constituent), cementite (light etching constituent), ledeburite (clusters of small, rounded pearlite particles), and graphite flakes (dark constituent). Etched in 4% picral. 250× More
Image
Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 2.50 Mottled pearlitic cast iron. Gray iron at upper left and white iron at lower right of photo. 4% picral etch. 250× More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.53 Chilled cast iron. Mottled region. Partially spheroidized pearlite, cementite, and phosphorus-rich eutectic. The region presenting a dotted feature, to the left, with a straight boundary is the phosphorus eutectic. To the right, a ledeburitic region. The white matrix is cementite More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.64 Mottled gray iron. Dark areas are regions of gray cast irons (the contours are not as clear as in Fig. 17.63 ). The rest of the cross section is white cast iron. Etchant: picral. More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.5 Cooling curves (schematic) of (a) gray cast iron, (b) white cast iron, and (c) mottled cast iron. In addition to the stable and metastable eutectic temperatures, the temperatures at the start of the solidification of the pro-eutetic austenite (T ℓ ) and the end of solidification (T f More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.msisep.t59220583
EISBN: 978-1-62708-259-4
... Abstract This chapter discusses the effect of composition and cooling rate on the microstructure and properties of cast irons and explains how they differ from steel. It describes the conditions under which white, gray, mottled (chilled), and nodular (ductile) cast irons are produced...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170100
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... to improve annealability beyond a certain point may result in an unacceptable tendency for the as-cast iron to be mottled instead of white. Because of the two metallurgical requirements described above, malleable irons involve a limited range of chemical composition and the restricted use of alloys...
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.71 Chilled region close to the surface of a hypereutectic gray cast iron, with a mottled aspect. Some white needles of cementite on a background of ledeburite. Dark regions are areas where graphite precipitation has happened. More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.69 Transverse cross section of a rolling mill roll. The cylinder surface (upper portion of the image) has been chilled. White cast iron region close to the roll surface, gray core, and mottled transition region. Etchant: iodine. More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.62 Appearance of the fracture surface of an old railroad wheel, made from chilled cast iron. It is possible to clearly see the white regions (close to the tread and flange), gray regions (away from the tread, close to the central region), and the intermediate mottled region. More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pht2.t51440207
EISBN: 978-1-62708-262-4
... is the dominant variable. Rapid cooling favors the formation of white cast irons (chilled cast iron), whereas slow cooling favors gray cast irons. Intermediate cooling rates can result in the simultaneous formation of metal carbide and flake graphite (mottled cast irons). Mottled cast irons are simply a mixture...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mgppis.t60400023
EISBN: 978-1-62708-258-7
... (as in steels) and solidification (as in cast irons). The chapter describes how the development of the iron-carbon phase diagram, coupled with the understanding of the kinetics of phase transformations through the use of isothermal transformation diagram, were breakthroughs in the advancement of ferrous...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.isceg.t59320031
EISBN: 978-1-62708-332-4
... Abstract This chapter discusses the crystal structures of steel and cast iron, the iron-iron carbide equilibrium diagram, microconstituents or phases in the iron-iron carbide phase diagram, the iron-carbon carbide-silicon equilibrium diagram of cast irons, and the influence on microstructure...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mnm2.t53060247
EISBN: 978-1-62708-261-7
..., while gray irons with softer graphite are reasonably strong and machinable. Mottled irons, in which both graphite and iron carbide are formed during solidification, are harder and less readily machinable than the gray irons. Another very significant foundry property of cast iron is that when the stable...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mgppis.t60400001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-258-7
... irons: the cast iron that has a gray fracture appearance and the cast iron that has a white fracture appearance. Thus, the names gray iron and white iron evolved. Those irons that have a mixed gray and white appearance are called mottled iron . These names still apply today. Other cast irons...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.smnm.t52140175
EISBN: 978-1-62708-264-8
... dendrites. They generally grow to sizes larger than the dendrite spacing. Notice that in the mottled region in Fig. 16.3 , many of these spherical gray regions, which have become trapped in the white iron that surrounds them, are visible. In fully gray cast irons, the spherical regions have grown outward...