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molybdenum alloys

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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 1 Elevated-temperature properties of molybdenum and molybdenum alloys. (a) Tensile strength. (b) Larson-Miller parameter (LMP) with temperature given in degrees Kelvin and the time to rupture, t r , given in hours. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 5.29 Anodic polarization curves for nickel-molybdenum alloys in 1 N H 2 SO 4 . Redrawn from Ref 26 More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 11.24 Secondary hardening of molybdenum alloy steels. Source: Ref 11 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 10.7 Influence of a molybdenum alloy addition on the dependence of hardness on tempering temperature. The incremental hardness increase caused by alloying is represented by ΔH. Source: Ref 10.3 More
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Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 17 Secondary hardening of molybdenum alloy steels. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 5.14 Effect of molybdenum content on SCC resistance of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys in 20% NaCl + 05% CH 3 COOH + 10 atm H 2 S + 10 atm CO 2 + 1 g/L S 8 . Source: Ref 5.45 More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 4-14 Effect of molybdenum content on the austenite phase field in Fe-Mo-C alloys. Source: Ref 20 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cw.t51820125
EISBN: 978-1-62708-339-3
... in this chapter is on the CRAs and in particular nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys. The chapter provides a basic understanding of general welding considerations and describes the welding metallurgy of molybdenum-containing CRAs and of nickel-copper, nickel-chromium, and nickel-chromium-iron CRAs. It discusses...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.emea.t52240547
EISBN: 978-1-62708-251-8
... nickel alloys. Corrosion- and heat-resistant nickel alloys include commercially pure and low-alloy nickels, nickel-copper alloys, nickel-molybdenum and nickel-silicon alloys, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys, and nickel-chromium-iron-molybdenum-copper alloys. Special nickel...
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 4.15 Effect of molybdenum on start of beta-to-alpha transformation. Increasing the molybdenum content in titanium-molybdenum alloys shifts the initial transformation of beta to alpha to the right. Hence, beta is more readily retained. More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170308
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... Abstract This article discusses the role of alloying in the production and use of common refractory metals, including molybdenum, tungsten, niobium, tantalum, and rhenium. It provides an overview of each metal and its alloys, describing the compositions, properties, and processing...
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 4.5 Effect of cooling rate on martensite-start (M s ) transformation temperature. As molybdenum content increases, the M s drops below 600 °C (1110 °F) at 7.1% Mo in the titanium-molybdenum alloy system. The M s transformation temperature is not affected by quenching rate. More
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Published: 01 November 2013
, copper alloys, magnesium alloys, beryllium, stainless steels, nickel alloys, titanium and titanium alloys, iron and nickel and cobalt superalloys, niobium and niobium alloys, tantalum and tantalum alloys, molybdenum and molybdenum alloys, tungsten alloys Process variations Closed-die forging More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 3 Effect of tungsten content on the room-temperature mechanical properties of tungsten-molybdenum alloys More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 2-123 Crankshaft for a mechanical forging press. 6500 lb (2948 kg), nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930353
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
... Abstract This article discusses the weldability and fusion weld properties of refractory metal alloys. The alloys discussed include tantalum, niobium, rhenium, molybdenum, and tungsten. molybdenum niobium rhenium tantalum tungsten weldability THE REFRACTORY METALS, which include...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fahtsc.t51130541
EISBN: 978-1-62708-284-6
... Osmium (Os) 4.5–4.6 2.5–2.6 Pure Tungsten (W) 0.6–8.7 0.3–4.8 Iron-cobalt-nickel alloys 4.8–5.1 2.7–2.8 Pure Molybdenum (Mo) 5.6 3.1 Pure Arsenic (As) 6.0 3.3 Pure Germanium (Ge) 6.1 3.4 Pure Hafnium (Hf) 5.7–7.0 3.2–3.9 Pure Zirconium (Zr) 6.3–6.6 3.5–3.7 Pure...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.emea.t52240583
EISBN: 978-1-62708-251-8
... elements are 100 ppm carbon, 200 ppm oxygen, 100 ppm nitrogen, and only 15 ppm hydrogen. Niobium and its alloys are protected from these impurities by melting and casting in vacuum or by processing in sacrificial molybdenum containers. Small alloying additions of zirconium and yttrium are added to tie up...
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 2 Creep curves for a molybdenum-vanadium low-alloy steel under tension at four stress levels at 600 °C (1112 °F). Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 5.19 Recommended region of chromium and molybdenum content of nickel-base alloy with approximately 55 to 60 wt% Ni in H 2 S-CO 2 -Cl − -S environment. Line 1: SCC; 230 °C (450 °F), l MPa H 2 S + 1 MPa CO 2 + 25 wt% NaCl + 1 g/L S 8 , 336 h; four-point bent beam. Line 2: hydrogen More